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Rapscallion by Ross Leidy

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    Posted: 09/06/2012 at 10:36am

I am pleased to introduce a new looper's blade - Rapscallion.  The prototype blade initially appeared anonymously in this thread, but after playing the blade for a short time, I felt that it was something special.  Since then, I've engaged a few other players to evaluate the blade, and the results have been very enthusiastic.  I knew the composition deserved a name and to be added to the lineup. 

First, a few details about the blade:
5-ply (Masur Birch - Mahogany - Kiri - Mahogany - Masur Birch)
6.2mm
82g - 88g (depending upon shape and type of handle wood)
OFF-
Medium flex

The Masur Birch outers are medium-hard (a bit harder than walnut), so this blade's dwell time comes primarily from its flex.  It's a predictable flex that rewards an aggressive loop or loop-drive, while still maintaining sufficient stiffness to support blocking.    I'm not a very accomplished looper, but with this blade I was bringing down balls that I was sure would go long.  I know it's just a wooden blade, but it felt like magic.  :)

I do on occasion solicit a blade review from someone who I know will really put a blade through its paces and who is able to articulate the results of their findings.  In the interest of full disclosure, these are compensated reviews, but not tied in any way to the outcome of the review.  Ideally, a blade will be rated favorably, and I'll move forward with the design.  However, even if a blade has shortcomings or even just plain sucks, an honest, thorough review helps me determine what I need to change going forward. 

The review that follows is one such review.  MYTT member Caballero and I began communicating a couple months back about a possible blade project.  I appreciated his enthusiam for the sport and how he expressed himself, which led me to ask if he'd be willing to evalutate and review the Rapscallion.  He graciously accepted.  He's shared with me some rough drafts of his review, and he's really put a lot of effort into it, which I greatly appreciate.  We agreed that I would make the initial post to introduce the blade and that he would follow with his multi-part review.

To start things off, here are some photos of a few different Rapscallion blades.







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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote VladiTT Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/06/2012 at 10:51am
Your blade Ross are with best craftmanship ever
i dunno where you study and what,but you are the most talanted artist

i hope very soon will test the blade that i order to you,and will play as good as it looks :)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hozze Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/06/2012 at 11:18am
Very nice Ross!

How do you think that would work in a C-pen format, and what would it do to the weight?


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rokphish Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/06/2012 at 11:58am
WOW!! I'm salivating right now... 

I must confessed that I was skeptical awhile back when looking at Ross' exotic blades. I couldn't believe that they would play as nicely as they look.

However, after trying out one of his blade I changed my opinion drastically. The one I tried was as a great of a performer as well as having a great look!
 
From the pictures above I probably would like to play with the second AN and the ST (looks like a CO). The first AN type I haven't tried before and the FL looks small on the neck and very wide at the bottom, not sure how it would feel...

Are these already out for sale or still in the trial period?

rapscallion  (ræpˈskæljən) 
 
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a disreputable person; rascal or rogue

Is that what you had in mind when naming the blade? Tongue
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote caballero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/06/2012 at 4:11pm

Dear Players and Fellows

It is a pleasure to see how some of you have already began posting on this thread. I now see why Ross suggested this venue to be the first place to submit a composite review of the Rapscallion, a new looping blade that should have a broad appeal as a multi-talented performance instrument.


As a scholar in addition to being a player, I consider reviews sacred. They are, for me, discrete representations of an attempt to place subjective impressions in the most rational and logical format. And, in order to balance the implacable and always present human myopia, reviewers should freely disclose their subjectivities, inclinations and backgrounds.


So, here are my confessions. I am an adult who, like many on this forum, decided recently to reentered the world of Tennis Table. In the last few months I have been unlearning and relearning most of the basic and advanced elements of the game. Being fully aware of my physical and mental limitations (as compared to my youth years), and of the limited time I have to master the game, has perhaps made me more conscious of every little step in the training process and aware of the role the equipment has in helping (or hampering) progress and the enjoyment of the game.


Perhaps it was this awareness that took me to Ross, which then led to the writing of this review.


I may be preaching to the choir here, but as I ready to share my thoughts and that of friends who played with the Rapscallion, I propose that this review should follow an interactive flow, similar to that which I have seen on this forum. My plans are to submit pictures, thoughts and data organized in at least four sections.


First, I will share an evaluation summary in the common conventional format. Second, I plan to narrate the blade's experience here in Blacksburg, VA, and address the issue of handcrafting versus mass-production and how that may impact the player's performance. Third, I will share my friends' reactions (players with considerable TT experience), so you will have a broader spectrum of voices to consider. The other section(s) will address issues of blade construction, performance (loops, chops, drives, blocks, serves, etc.), and rubbers' suitability.


Forum member's reactions, questions and concerns posted now and after the summary will certainly influence the way that the other sections will develop. So, feel free to continue giving life to this thread.


Cheers


Caballero

Hurray for outstanding independent blade-makers:

Leidy's Rapscallion
Charlie's 1Ply & 9-10-9
American Hinoki's WRC Quantum 3-ply
Nexy Calix

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ross Leidy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/06/2012 at 10:23pm
Originally posted by Hozze Hozze wrote:

Very nice Ross!

How do you think that would work in a C-pen format, and what would it do to the weight?


Yes, I could certainly build it as a Cpen.  I'd estimate that the weight would be around 80+/- depending on the type of handle wood used.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ross Leidy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/06/2012 at 10:28pm
Originally posted by rokphish rokphish wrote:

WOW!! I'm salivating right now... 

I must confessed that I was skeptical awhile back when looking at Ross' exotic blades. I couldn't believe that they would play as nicely as they look.

However, after trying out one of his blade I changed my opinion drastically. The one I tried was as a great of a performer as well as having a great look!
 
From the pictures above I probably would like to play with the second AN and the ST (looks like a CO). The first AN type I haven't tried before and the FL looks small on the neck and very wide at the bottom, not sure how it would feel...

Are these already out for sale or still in the trial period?

rapscallion  (ræpˈskæljən) 
 
— n
a disreputable person; rascal or rogue

Is that what you had in mind when naming the blade? Tongue

Thanks, rokphish.  I'm glad you enjoyed your time with the SOJ.  I build the blades on-demand, so if you'd like to buy a Rapscallion, please contact me offline and I can get you on the waiting list.

I definitely had rascal/rogue in mind when naming the blade.  Smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rokphish Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/07/2012 at 12:04am
Originally posted by Ross Leidy Ross Leidy wrote:

Thanks, rokphish.  I'm glad you enjoyed your time with the SOJ.  I build the blades on-demand, so if you'd like to buy a Rapscallion, please contact me offline and I can get you on the waiting list.

I definitely had rascal/rogue in mind when naming the blade.  Smile

I'll keep that in mind while waiting for the reviews... Great job!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Jolan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/07/2012 at 12:08am
Nice conical handle on pic N°4 !
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote liulin04 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/07/2012 at 12:12am
I do like scallions
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carryboy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/07/2012 at 12:51am
Originally posted by liulin04 liulin04 wrote:

I do like scallions


Smile!!!!!!!!!!!! Me too
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote aeoliah Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/07/2012 at 11:22am
What are the factors that give this blade the good looping capability ?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ross Leidy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/07/2012 at 9:42pm
Originally posted by aeoliah aeoliah wrote:

What are the factors that give this blade the good looping capability ?

There are a few factors: it has a relatively soft core, the overall thickness allows some flex, and the masur birch seems to be a resilient wood.  I think that its non-linear grain pattern gives it a bit more flex even though it's a medium-hard wood.  All of this contributes to the dwell time of the blade.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote melarimsa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/07/2012 at 9:42pm
Best handle I ever laid my hands on !
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote W0LovePP Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/07/2012 at 10:03pm
It is a pretty blade!
 
Would you mind sharing the thickness of each layer, including the core? Thanks.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote aeoliah Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/08/2012 at 12:04am
What would be the estimated weight for J-pen ?
Can you do something on the handle to make it attractive like SH or C-pen without sacrificing too much in weight ? Perhaps using one wood layer on the surface of the handle ?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fatt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/08/2012 at 12:23am
Originally posted by aeoliah aeoliah wrote:

What would be the estimated weight for J-pen ?
Can you do something on the handle to make it attractive like SH or C-pen without sacrificing too much in weight ? Perhaps using one wood layer on the surface of the handle ?

he is falling for it Clap

1 question for you aeoliah: for a traditional jpen player, how hard is it to adapt to that double jpen grip below;
if not too hard you might have fun designing something with Ross.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote caballero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/08/2012 at 7:02am

Perhaps aeoliah's question is this review true opening shot (or better yet, first “thrown blade,” since we are talking about a blade here).Wink


Totally legitimate—what makes this blade the holy grail of looping blades? In short, the blade, at 85 grams, is light, but it is also noticeably flexible and (most importantly) remarkably powerful (I would not say “fast” because the response mechanism takes a few milliseconds more than, say, a stiffer blade).


As any TT blade expert would say, the flex is key for producing spin, for picking up the opponent's heavy and low underspin shots, and for carrying up the ball from below enveloped in a new spin. Its light-weight allows the player to exert the highest level of physical activity for a longer time (looping is a true tiring activity), and move the blade faster afar from the table to a flip near the net. The blade's power is responsible, then, for sending the ball back to the other side of the net even when you are far from the table: without having to spend all your energy in a single shot, a powerful blade like this one will make it seem as magic.


Powerful, flexible and light? Too contradictory to simply be for real. This seemed too much like the blurbs and write-ups of equipment companies: the misinformation that fuels much of the uneducated EJ outbreak among the upmarket. It is at this point, when I saw and felt the living contradiction in my hands, that I became convinced that this blade was exceptional.


I will attempt expanding on Ross' classic 3 property points answer to aeoliah (soft core, thickness flexibility and the masur birch), but as we continue on this discussion my main contribution will hopefully be on showing how, in fact, the Rapscallion dramatically improves every looper's shot and movement.


The blade's unique composition: masur birch - mahogany - kiri - mahogany - masur birch


The Chinese Kiri tree (Paulownia tomentosa), the core of the Rapscallion, is shrouded in beautiful myth in areas of Asia, but largely despised as an invasive species in the Americas—its seeds traveled the world with the coveted Chinese porcelain. It helped that these seeds grow into majestic trees rather quickly. And, I speculate, that its speedy growth may have something to do with its light weight-- it must be difficult to build a dense-wood tree in a hurry. The Kiri is about twice as hard as the Balsa, yet it remains among the most weightless wood-layers available for TT paddles—a sprightly, agile and graceful one. No wonder, then, that by having at its nucleus such a migratory and locomotive wood the Rapscallion can easily flex to absorbs the ball's impact. However, sucking up the ball alone will not suffice a gladiating looper. This blade should have a way to shoot back the ball with power and precision.


With less effort than it seems, the two harder veneers guarding the softer Kiri will make out of the 40 mm ball a dangerous projectile, sending it back faster and spinier than it came. Closer to the Kiri, and becoming harder only gradually, is the venerable Mahogany, native of the Caribbean and Central America—used for the last 500 years as one of the main sources of ship building and famously durable furniture. The Mahogany, true to its reputation, is a key reliable piece in this blade; it takes the ball into a deliberately harder push out.


But to make the shot as devastating as the looper hopes, the Masur Birch has to come in exactly at this time. This Birch, well-known around the world for its grains and face, which seems to exhibit bird eyes, is original from Scandinavia and Northern Russia. The strange flecked figure, its unique aspect, seems a byproduct of a defense mechanism against insect attack. This high figure and strength, which developed while healing the damage done by an invasive boring beetle, comes to good use in the Rapscallion. It is stiff, but not too much and as such it seems even soft, and yet it is remarkably strong and potent (perhaps this is why Ross used the word “resilient” in an earlier post to refer to the Masur). If compared to composite blades, the Masur does the driving effect of the carbon, but in the Rapscallion, it does it from an outside veneer—completely within the ITTF guidelines. And when polished well, the Masur not only looks gorgeous, but it makes gluing and ungluing a piece of cake.


Hopefully you have already noticed that a Rapscallion's important yet uncommon characteristic is not only the interesting combination of core and veneers, but the order in which they are placed. Moving from the center, the layers advance from soft, harder and hardest, and perhaps, this may be the reason why this blade has a totally different feel of power and dwell than any other blade I have wielded (and I have wielded a broad diversity of them for the purpose of this review). As seen through the eyes of the Janka Ratings:


Masur (1200)- Mahogany (800) – Kiri (250)- Mahogany (800) - Masur (1200)


This progressive movement of force may account for the strange lack of an obvious catapult effect on a blade that absorbs hard hits and yet spits out balls at a unbelievable speed.


I will continue writing about its sweet spot, vibrations (or lack of thereof), throw angle and other important aspects of this blades in sections like this separated by a day or three. Your questions and comments will definitively find their way in what I will say.


(In attempting to address aeoliah's concern I may have deviated a bit from the original format).  



Edited by caballero - 09/08/2012 at 8:22am
Hurray for outstanding independent blade-makers:

Leidy's Rapscallion
Charlie's 1Ply & 9-10-9
American Hinoki's WRC Quantum 3-ply
Nexy Calix

Feedback Caballero
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rokphish Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/08/2012 at 7:50am
just a suggestion, perhaps you should re-shoot the photo above as it looks like it's out of focus.
if you use a digital camera you might want to turn on the macro (flower) mode... Wink
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ross Leidy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/08/2012 at 11:04am
Originally posted by rokphish rokphish wrote:

just a suggestion, perhaps you should re-shoot the photo above as it looks like it's out of focus.
if you use a digital camera you might want to turn on the macro (flower) mode... Wink

While this photo isn't perfectly focused either, it does show the plies close-up.  

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote W0LovePP Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/08/2012 at 12:00pm
Rapscallion's layers are hardest on the outside, hardness of layers decreases towards the inside, reaching the softest in the core.
 
I have been wondering about a design the opposite way: hardest core, but softest outer layer. Could anyone throw in some comments on this kind of design to have certain flexibility for looping, good control close to the table, and for power away from the table?
 
Thanks.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tabten5 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/08/2012 at 7:19pm
Two points:

1) We need to know what level, and style, caballero plays in order for the review to have meaning
2) Compensated reviews are the lowest form of review. They render the reviewer biased, and that's a terrible shame.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fatt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/08/2012 at 7:40pm
Originally posted by tabten5 tabten5 wrote:

Two points:

1) We need to know what level, and style, caballero plays in order for the review to have meaning
2) Compensated reviews are the lowest form of review. They render the reviewer biased, and that's a terrible shame.

I independently (despite my inclination to support Ross' work) disagree; for example, among all journalists doing reviews about any product, if too many were biased we would by now have no credible review about anything at all and that obviously is not the case.
I would say that a compensated review encourages the reviewer to be 1) more focused on quality of research, presentation and wording and 2), especially when there is full disclosure like in Ross' case, 2)  very careful about not being biased because any exaggerated praise will of course sound doubtful and annoy some people (like you).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote danhs Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/08/2012 at 8:49pm
Originally posted by W0LovePP W0LovePP wrote:

Rapscallion's layers are hardest on the outside, hardness of layers decreases towards the inside, reaching the softest in the core.
 
I have been wondering about a design the opposite way: hardest core, but softest outer layer. Could anyone throw in some comments on this kind of design to have certain flexibility for looping, good control close to the table, and for power away from the table?
 
Thanks.  
  I think the reason that's not really a good idea is that the harder woods are generally (although not always) much heavier, so you would either have an extremely thin, flexible blade of ordinary weight that was also very soft OR a blade of normal thickness with a soft feel but very heavy. Neither option sounds great to me.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tsanyc Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/08/2012 at 9:51pm
nice pics
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote caballero Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/09/2012 at 1:05am

I will attempt to address a few of the issues just raised (sorry for the elongated and “nerdy” response).


I- rokphish

1- Pics


rokphish, thanks for the tip. Yes, I should have taken more care with the pics. Ross obviously took better pictures, and his shows the layers more clearly. It surprised me at first, but the fascination some members of this forum (and that of OOAK) have for beauty, craftsmanship and detail has honestly inspired me to experience this sport more fully.


II- tabten5

tabten5, you submit candid and necessary questions. In truth, Ross and I had already began answering them. I was also planning to continue addressing them in piecemeal. Fully covering them now, however, may just be the best choice (others may be thinking like you).


1- “Compensation”

Directly to the point: Ross' “compensation” is not that different from what publishing houses do when I review academic and scholarly manuscripts: http://bit.ly/RqvpsY Rarely, if ever, there is a published review in which the book is not given totally free (this is the common practice in academic and trade publications alike). This compensation, however, hardly affects the outcome of the review (there is no reason why it should since the “compensation” never compensates for the effort).


Often these books are really expensive because of their limited circulation, and yet reviewers receive them gratis simply as a small token of appreciation for their hard work. In reality, the work of writing a book-review is many times more consuming and difficult than what it seems. The same happens with blade-review, I now realize. For those who have done their share of reviews (in academia this means, pretty much, everybody), to think that “compensation” fuels or stains the review, is a joke. Moreover, short unsolicited and spontaneous reviews are hardly considered trustworthy.


The fact is that after inviting me to write a review, Ross first simply offered a modest discount for the blade, never a sufficient motivation for going through this process. But as I brought members of the (state undefeated) VT team to test and write about the blade, he expanded the offer and included the team's coach in the discount (you will be reading his review shortly, I hope).


The story began a couple of months ago when I approached Ross about trying one of his demo blades. At that time I felt stuck in my TT training (could not maintain a consistent 100 hard shots and was getting frustrated by the slow progress in mastering other techniques). I acquired some new and used equipment, and began learning to work with the rackets on my own (Ely Cole was a great help too). Paying more attention to the equipment, I thought, may also help to learn how and why practicing certain techniques was so important. I had read many threads and posts about Charlie, Kevin and Ross' blades, that I decided to contact them. Reading about these craftsmen, and then communicating with them gave me a insight on blade-making that I would not have gotten in any other way.


When Ross, in what it seemed as an authentic desire to evaluate his brainchild, offered me the opportunity to write about the blade, I saw this in the same way I see academic journal's invitation to write about a book: a chance to learn more about the subject. And since this was not a finished product (Ross was decided to create not simply a beautiful blade, but one that would fill-in the gap of looper's blade), I thought I would participate in its creation by giving it a close and critical evaluation.


Looking at how much effort and dedication Ross (as other craftsmen) put on their work, I would not even consider feasible to do less than what they do. Moreover, (and this is something I plan to expand later) Ross was persistently inquiring with doubts he had and pressing me on points that may produce negative reactions on players (i.e., how players may react to the sudden power increase the blade shows and the many gears its throw angle has). This, I thought, was an admirable display of honor and openness.


2- Playing level

From the start I made it clear to Ross that I was only reentering TT as an adult with limited experience in the game. But he insisted that other issues mattered most: the passion for the game, a critical yet balanced evaluation, and the ability to convey its meaning in a coherent manner.


As a teenager in the Dominican Republic, I had played long outside of professional clubs (what in the U.S. is called, “basement” playing), and unfortunately, had developed poor techniques. As an adult, I tried my luck at Mitchell Seidenfeld's club in Minnesota-- at which time I realized I had to work hard if I wanted to become a decent player. The academic tenure-track, unfortunately, did not afforded much time. This year, however, my kids showed a sudden and more serious interest in TT, and they, I have to confess, rule my life.


Prompted by new hopes I decided to invested myself fully into this game (by now you may have noticed that this is my modus operandi). So, I approached the VT team coach, and began playing hard with him and the team, and at the local club. 


Moreover, in the last six months we have been particularly lucky to have been training with Wu Xian Sheng - “Mr. Wu” (coached China's Liu Guoliang when Guoliang was a little kid and is 2350 USTT). 


I cannot tell you my USTT score because I have not been at a USTT tournament yet. The players with whom I daily train and play are mostly between 1600-2000. And, as I mentioned above, I have included them in this blade's evaluation (I did not feel I could present to you the most objective and informative review of this blade without their help). So, as I mentioned at the introduction, in this review you get more than one review; you get the best a diverse group of dedicated players think about this blade.


Thanks again for the chance to explain. Hope I have addressed your concerns.





Edited by caballero - 09/09/2012 at 1:40am
Hurray for outstanding independent blade-makers:

Leidy's Rapscallion
Charlie's 1Ply & 9-10-9
American Hinoki's WRC Quantum 3-ply
Nexy Calix

Feedback Caballero
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assiduous View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote assiduous Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/09/2012 at 1:10am
such beauty. Ross Lady, I appeal to you again, figure a way to engrave letters on them. There is no way the person who did such a blade cannot figure a way to burn a few letters on them
puppy412 : Sorry man, I don't mean to sound disrespectful, but I know that more training will make me better, I don't need to come here to figure that out
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fatt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/09/2012 at 1:39am
Caballero: reading your English is as peaceful and enjoyable as sitting on a creek's bank and listening the clear water flow. Thanks again; can't wait to read more about your RL endeavor.
rl gear ( •_•)O¯`·.¸.·´¯`°Q(•_•) feedback
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote aeoliah Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/09/2012 at 2:27am
Hi Fatt, actually I have the double sided J-pen : I have two double sided Violin J-pen, J-RH and J-PH, but I do not seem to like (or more frankly speaking I find it difficult to execute Embarrassed) the RPB, so in the end I custom ordered a normal Violin J-pen. I even have the C-pen version.
I am a poor looper, so I am interested in this blade.
I envy you guys for having very attractive handles, whilst I have to content myself with the cork blockBig smile
I have one suggestion to Ross : perhaps it is time to give some identification on the blade (in this case perhaps by etching the name : "rapscallion" so we know what blade we are using. I have now two, perhaps the third is already in mind, and it might happen that I will forget which one is which.


Edited by aeoliah - 09/09/2012 at 2:30am
Member of the Single Ply Hinoki Club
Sotto Voce J-Pen, Acuda P2 max.




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote emihet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/09/2012 at 4:04am
how does this blade play in comparison to your copy of the acoustic?
Stiga Clipper Wood,Butterfly Power Drive, Viscaria,
CUSTOM: BBC, PALATINUS, ROSS, BORKO
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