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Tips to avoid getting jammed?

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shinchan1506217 View Drop Down
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    Posted: 11/06/2017 at 3:18am
I often find myself jammed (not knowing which hand to use) after someone does a big looping stroke motion.  Most times I don't hit the ball back, but when I do, I don't close my racket enough and the ball just flies out.  What kind of mentality should I maintain to not get jammed and not panic when the opponent initiates the attack?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lightzy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/06/2017 at 5:42am
Probably the mentality of practicing this return a lot in training.
Also probably take a couple of quick steps back when you see someone winding up like that.
And also possibly to work more on observing what kind of balls they choose to attack like that and try to make sure never to give them that kind of ball at all.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NextLevel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/06/2017 at 6:12am
Originally posted by shinchan1506217 shinchan1506217 wrote:

I often find myself jammed (not knowing which hand to use) after someone does a big looping stroke motion.  Most times I don't hit the ball back, but when I do, I don't close my racket enough and the ball just flies out.  What kind of mentality should I maintain to not get jammed and not panic when the opponent initiates the attack?

Keep your racket up.  If you lift the racket into the ball, the topspin will usually carry the ball high and long unless you have incredible touch and timing.

Try to hit the side-top of the ball and then cover it if you swing into it.

Practice this a lot.

Do good pushes half short and low or fast and long with good placement to avoid this problem in the first place.
I like putting heavy topspin on the ball...
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vanjr View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote vanjr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/06/2017 at 8:08am
Returning this shot from a little bit off the table makes it much easier.
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Fulanodetal View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Fulanodetal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/06/2017 at 9:40am
Are these balls targeted to your cross over point (elbow)?

Because this happens to me sometimes, but this happens when my weight is on the heel of my feet and my feet are planted firmly on the ground (in other words, Im being lazy!). I try to solve it by using more active footwork and my weight on the ball of my feet. That way I can turn quickly either for a FH stance or a BH stance.

It also does help to read your opponents body position. His ready position should tell you how hard the shot will be, and *** depending on the player***, his shoulders might tell you roughly where the ball will be placed. Again, it depends on the player. Some players swing their arms as opposed to using their whole body when producing a shot.

If the ball is coming to your cross over point, your choice of BH or FH depends on your distance to the table. If close, then you might want to favor the BH. If youre far enough, then you have enough time to use your FH.

Always return to your neutral position!

FdT


Edited by Fulanodetal - 11/06/2017 at 9:40am
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ttTurkey View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ttTurkey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/07/2017 at 1:26am
This is often a sign of too much ball-watching and not enough reading of the opponent. Try incorporating some drills where your opponent is looping at you in a set pattern but throws in random loops out of the pattern to a different placement. This will teach you to anticipate the direction of the shot.

Could also be that your service return and/or pushing needs work if you are popping up too many balls.
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APW46 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote APW46 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/07/2017 at 3:48pm
 The rock solid tactical advice I can assure you given in the heat of battle if an opponent is catching you there enough to make things in his favour, step off the table slightly, especially if you have big strokes,
 ( so more time to get them in)
 and play wide angles early point (short game) it makes the angle of play difficult for them to pin you there because from whatever angle you receive the ball, it is coming across you rather than at you , in essence, the angles are more  'black and white'
You also need to look at the reason you are being 'jammed'  in your crossover point, its because you are predetermining your stroke before your opponent has played the ball in a situation when he has options. 
 Don't go round for a f/hand 'blindly' when the rally is in a b/hand to b/hand exchange with a right to right hander, if you want to get your f/hand in, you have to do something to make it easier for you, like playing a b/hand down the line to his f/hand, it tends to open the table up for a free rally without being 'jammed' 
 'Playing the lines opens the rally up'  try it.
 So, angles early rally, lines to open up. And just to add, once you have done that, straight into his crossover is a great option, so you have done to him what he is doing to you. easy LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Simon_plays Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/07/2017 at 4:30pm
I was given the following exercise to do by my coach. (I'll try and describe it, thought it might be a bit difficult.)

With your back to a table, no bat in hand, assume your playing position, and side-step from corner to corner. Each time you reach the left corner of the table, touch the table with your right hand, making sure to twist shoulders. Then side-step to the other corner and reach for the right corner with your left hand. 

These quick steps and twisting of your upper body are supposed to help react more quickly when your crossover point is attacked. I think it did me some good.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote APW46 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/07/2017 at 4:53pm
Originally posted by Simon_plays Simon_plays wrote:

I was given the following exercise to do by my coach. (I'll try and describe it, thought it might be a bit difficult.)

With your back to a table, no bat in hand, assume your playing position, and side-step from corner to corner. Each time you reach the left corner of the table, touch the table with your right hand, making sure to twist shoulders. Then side-step to the other corner and reach for the right corner with your left hand. 

These quick steps and twisting of your upper body are supposed to help react more quickly when your crossover point is attacked. I think it did me some good.


 Your coach is looking at the technical way to get out of being 'jammed' not the reason, typical coaching.
If you don't have the time to apply that, which is pretty extensive, you won't achieve it.
The Older I get, The better I was.
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bard romance View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bard romance Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/09/2017 at 10:01am
More practice - random multiball between FH BH and middle. Getting jammed is usually a lack of readiness and anticipation. 
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