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The birth of modern table tennis?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote richrf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/10/2017 at 7:59pm
Originally posted by Baal Baal wrote:

Just sent a text to one person who might know more about how Stellan trained when he came up.


Great, I sent a message to his club. It would be fantastic if we c are able to contact him!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zeio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 2:46am
Below is the introduction for the Swedish table tennis team on Baidu Wiki.

Quote 上世纪70年代初,欧洲人在吸纳了弧圈球技术后向亚洲队发起冲击,拉开了新一轮的欧亚对抗,其中最具代表性的人物就是瑞典队的本格森。

(In the early '70s, after absorbing the loop technique, Europeans mounted an assault on the Asian teams, opening a new chapter of Euro-Asia confrontation, in which Stellan Bengtsson from Sweden was the most representative figure.

Here is an excerpt of an article posted on the Chinese forum fishtt(小魚兒乒乓網). It's titled "Prodigy Bengtsson".

Quote     虽然大器晚成大有人在,一般来说,男子乒乓球技术拔尖容易在18岁左右,女子乒乓球技术拔尖容易在16岁左右,这回要讲的是神童:本格森,1952年7月26日生。
    话说瑞典国家乒乓球队从来不聘用外籍教练,历史上曾有一次例外,1962年初聘请了前男子单打世界冠军日本的荻村伊智朗,执教十个月,除有日本队重要赛事请假回去一下,非常认真地传授了快攻技术和弧圈球技术,对于未满十岁的本格森直接就是这种打法。当时还有欧洲天王级的阿尔塞,防守型也成全攻型,但因为原来的刀痕特别深,严格地说应该是成了全能型。还有约翰森兄弟们。特别指出重锤子:约翰森原来也是打守球的,改打攻球后,成了铁榔头。但是当时弧圈球拉得最好的当数伯恩哈特。总之,荻村这十个月对日后瑞典成为乒乓球王国有不可磨灭的贡献。神童本格森七十年代成了世界快弧打法的最高手。男子单打世界冠军!

(Even though late-bloomers are not uncommon, but generally speaking, technical breakthrough tends to happen around the age of 18 for men, and 16 for women. For this chapter our prodigy is Bengtsson, born July 26, 1952.

The Swedish national table tennis team never hired a foreign coach, with an exception. In early 1962, former WTTC singles champion Ichiro Ogimura of Japan was hired to coach for 10 months. Other than taking leaves when there were important tournaments in Japan, Ogimura shared without reserve his fast-attack and loop techniques. Ultimately, this became the playing style for Bengtsson, a kid just shy of 10 years old. Back then there was the European King Alser, who switched from the defensive style to all-out offensive. However, old habits die hard, so strictly speaking, he became an allround player. There was also the Johansson brothers(TL's note: Kjell and Christer), in particular Kjell who was known as the Hammer(TL's note: Kjell "Hammaren" Johansson). Johansson also played a defensive style, but switched to offensive and got his nickname. Nonetheless, at the time Carl Johan Bernhardt was the best at looping. All in all, Ogimura's 10-month stay meant everything to Swedish rise as the table tennis kingdom. Prodigy Bengtsson became the best player of the fast-attack plus loop style of the '70s. Men's singles World Champion!)

Edited by zeio - 11/11/2017 at 6:04am
Viscaria FL - 91g
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Magic_M Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 3:19am
Fantastic thread. I am happy that I am not the only fan of Stellan Bengtsson. Big smile
Originally posted by Magic_M Magic_M wrote:

Today I give you some informations about my favorite player of the 70`s and 80`s. He was born 1952 in Falkenberg (Sweden). In the age of six years he played his first table tennis match in the basement of his parents house. In his childhood he tried different kinds of sports activities, before he watched the swedish table tennis team final 1963 (as one of 1.200 visitors) with the success of the local club BTK Falkenberg. From this moment on he concentrated his sports-activities 100% on table-tennis.

In the age of 16 he had the chance to go to Japan for three months. There he had some personal training with Ichiro Ogimura, who won twelve world champion titles in the 50`s and 60`s (later he became ITTF-president). This was a very important experience for him, because he learnt a lot from Ogimura ("I often think of him - he has changed my life").

In 1971 (in the age of only 19 years) he won the world championship in the single competition as first european since 1953, although it was the first time, that China participated in the championship again. During his long career (- 1987) he won 67 (!) international championships. Between 1980 and 1985 he played for several german clubs. Later he became a professional trainer and started his second career in Germany (ATSV Saarbrücken). 

Today he lives together with his wife Angelita in the USA and together they run a trainings camp in Sorrento Valley (http://www.stellangie.com).

As Bengtsson was my favorite player in my youth and as I like these thick straight handles of the Bengtsson blades, I decided, to collect Bengtsson blades as the second part of my collection.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zeio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 6:23am
More info on Carl-Johan Bernhardt.

Quote Carl-Johan Bernhardt, known as the first Swedish player to start playing with a loop, also achieved international success with, among others, Kjell Johansson and Hans Alsér. He played a total of 90 national matches and won the team-EM five times.

https://www.aftonbladet.se/sportbladet/bordtennis/article22465376.ab

There is a clip of Bernhardt playing against Konaka of Japan on April 9, 1965. Swedish proxy needed to watch.

https://www.oppetarkiv.se/video/15023508/aktuellt
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote richrf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 6:39am
Great stuff! Thanks Zeio! It's all coming together now.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote richrf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 6:44am
Thank you Magic_M! I believe more should be done to memorialize the impact that he and Ogimura had on the game. Of course, not to understate the effects that the Chinese players had on pushing everyone to find new strategies, tactics and techniques.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Baal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 8:49am
Eastern European contemporaries of Bengtsson like Surbek were looping heavily. They weren't moving as quickly and it seemed to come from the arm.

With inverted rubber looping was an obvious thing to do. Hell, in 1970 I was looping my forehand and so did every other kid at the Kevinge Bordtennis club. But there easn't much emphasis on how to move.

By yhe eay, Jimmy Butler, who was coached by Stellan in Sweden, in response to my text. also suggests there was a lot of Kapanese influence. He hss told me the footworh drills they did when he was in Sweden were brutal.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Baal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 8:52am
Somewher therr is a youtube instructional video from Japan from around 1958 showing Ogimura and another Japanese player doing a lot of training drills. I need to find it. It is fascinating.

Edit.  And here it is!  I recommend this one highly.  You can see footwork drills (especially around 9:00 mark), early counter looping, all sorts of cool stuff (even penhold chopping), along with an interesting sound track (a flute concerto by Jean Pierre Rampal).  These guys were defitinely moving better than their European counterparts of that era.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=6mEegMVTbIQ
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Baal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 9:25am
A couple more great video.  China vs Yugoslavia 1973 and 1975.  Lots of chances to see Surbek and Stipancic.

Also Xu Shao Fa (same guy the ball is named after, one of the first people to use a high toss serve).  If you compare, you can see the Bengtsson moved so effortlessly compared to his contemporaries, but there is plenty of looping going on.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aTT0iIqaRI 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLvZwj2duUk&t=1s
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Baal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 9:40am
A video history of Swedish table tennis.  Amazing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYkiUIelYO4
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote richrf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 12:15pm
Thanks for the information and videos Baal!

Thinking about Chinese innovation at the time, probably the most important were the short blocks and 3 ball offense which was devasting until Bengtsson introduced his own version of a two wing, short stroke, power style. One has to be very fast and use core power for this kind of game which he drew from Ogimura but also and amplified.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zeio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 1:06pm
In the short clip of the match between Bernhardt and Konaka in 1965, both already were counter-looping off the table. Konaka's strokes already looked more or less the modern form with the backswing, weight transfer, step-around footwork, and trunk rotation.

From 1966-1970, CNT was absent from international tournaments as China was in the midst of the Cultural Revolution. The progress of Chinese table tennis practically halted.

This period provided a rare environment for the western countries, namely Sweden and Hungary, to work on the new style.

Sweden focused more on speed, whereas Hungary focused more on spin. I've read a Chinese article depicting the distinct features of the two. Will see if I can dig it out.

Edited by zeio - 11/11/2017 at 1:23pm
Viscaria FL - 91g
+ Neo H3 2.15 Blk - 44.5g(55.3g uncut bare)
+ Hexer HD 2.1 Red - 49.3g(68.5g 〃 〃)
= 184.8g
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote berndt_mann Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 1:19pm
That other player in the Japanese instructional video may have been Tanaka.  I have bookmarked that particular video.  There is an impressive display of forehand and backhand lobbing by both players, and I believe it was Ogimura who demonstrated both a forehand and backhand chop from close to the table, mid-distance, and long distance.  

Edited by berndt_mann - 11/11/2017 at 1:21pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote richrf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 1:25pm
Always have to include the Hungarians in any discussion of the transition to modern shakehand style. I think by the time if this video they are already using speed glue, but I always admired Klampar's economy of motion and energy and his beautiful touch. In another thread I posted a slow motion study of Klampar's backhand. He still uses pretty much using the same style today that he used back then, and still playing great.



Edited by richrf - 11/11/2017 at 3:28pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote APW46 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 2:00pm
 Absolutely amazing thread this, I love it, thanks for all the brilliant contributions. One thing I am interested in is the time gap between the innovations regarding junior players and that progressing to those individuals making an impact on the top of the world scene. It is becoming obvious that the real transgression from the classic to modern game was the 1960's, I think most of us kind of knew that, but it is nice to see this analysed in detail here. 
Another interesting fact for me, is that this is well before the information technology boom, so innovations must have been spread more sedately.  The knowledge back then was virtually exclusively passed on through coaches.
 Also note, in virtually every clip, the table used is the Stiga Expert VM, IMO the best table ever made.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote richrf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 3:16pm
Originally posted by APW46 APW46 wrote:

 Absolutely amazing thread this, I love it, thanks for all the brilliant contributions. One thing I am interested in is the time gap between the innovations regarding junior players and that progressing to those individuals making an impact on the top of the world scene. It is becoming obvious that the real transgression from the classic to modern game was the 1960's, I think most of us kind of knew that, but it is nice to see this analysed in detail here. 
Another interesting fact for me, is that this is well before the information technology boom, so innovations must have been spread more sedately.  The knowledge back then was virtually exclusively passed on through coaches.
 Also note, in virtually every clip, the table used is the Stiga Expert VM, IMO the best table ever made.




Here is an early Hungarian training film demonstrating their newly developed super-loop technique. Note, this is pre-speed glue era.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Baal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 3:25pm
Originally posted by berndt_mann berndt_mann wrote:

That other player in the Japanese instructional video may have been Tanaka.  I have bookmarked that particular video.  There is an impressive display of forehand and backhand lobbing by both players, and I believe it was Ogimura who demonstrated both a forehand and backhand chop from close to the table, mid-distance, and long distance.  


Yes Im almost certain tbe other player is Tanaka.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Baal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 3:27pm
Also the Yugoslavs knew what the Hungarians were up to and copied it. They did not like each other.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote richrf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 3:30pm
Do we know who discovered speed glue first? Some say Klampar, others say Surbek.

Edited by richrf - 11/11/2017 at 3:30pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Baal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 4:45pm
All I have heard is "Hungarians". I don't recall reading which.

Surbek is Croatian (Yugoslavia in his playing days).

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote NextLevel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 7:07pm
Easily one of the best mytt threads of all time. It should be stickied in the coaching forum.
I like putting heavy topspin on the ball...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote richrf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 7:19pm
A recent video of Istvan Jonyer, Klampar's teammate in the early 70s and 80s, showing his double wing super-loop technique that earned him numerous titles.



Edited by richrf - 11/11/2017 at 11:31pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zeio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2017 at 11:29pm
Originally posted by Baal Baal wrote:

Originally posted by berndt_mann berndt_mann wrote:

That other player in the Japanese instructional video may have been Tanaka.  I have bookmarked that particular video.  There is an impressive display of forehand and backhand lobbing by both players, and I believe it was Ogimura who demonstrated both a forehand and backhand chop from close to the table, mid-distance, and long distance.  


Yes Im almost certain tbe other player is Tanaka.

Yes, Toshiaki Tanaka. I skipped the passage about him and Ogimura performing in the film. Added it back.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote zeio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/12/2017 at 12:02am
The story for the discovery of speed glue goes like this:

USA TABLE TENNIS MAGAZINE • Mar/Apr 2009
Quote This is how Hungarian player Tibor Klampar recalls the moment when, through sheer chance, he discovered the phenomenon of speedglue, thereby changing the sport for ever, from one moment to the next.

“I was in a training session with my brother, and was playing poorly. I stripped the rubber off the racket and stuck on a new one. I continued to play poorly, so I stripped the new one off and replaced it with the one that I’d played with at the outset.”

As he heard the ball make that clicking sound, there was a ‘click’ in Klampar’s mind.

“I noticed that my original rubber had suddenly become much more effective. I was getting greater spin and speed in my strokes. I immediately realised that this had something to do with the glue, and from that moment I began gluing before every training session and before every match. On some occasions I was doing it six times a day…The improvement in my game was unbelievable. I was able to take a relaxed approach and no longer needed to invest so much energy for each stroke. I was able to play strokes that I’d never managed before.”

In those days it was usual to break in new rubbers for a week or two in the run up to a competition. Klampar succeeded in keeping the speedglue process secret for over a year before his national team colleague, János Tákacs, caught him in the lavatories with a tub of glue, his racket, and a stripped-off rubber. The secret was out; the news spread like wildfire through the table tennis community.

“The idea of gluing rubbers repeatedly was revolutionary,” comments Mikael Appelgren, European singles champion 1982, 1988 and 1990, and the first of the Swedish players to begin speed-gluing around 1979-80, “Most players were still sceptical and thought that the risks were too great. I personally started off gluing only on the forehand. The backhand was far too sensitive- because the ball left the racket much too quickly, and to start with I had problems with the service return and with blocking. But I got a fantastic spin on the forehand topspin.”


As well as the effect it had on the technical progress.

Quote “On its way through the sponge and the topsheet, the solvent creates space for itself – in equal amounts in all directions. It acts like a spring between the molecules of the rubber, which becomes distended. The rubber becomes taut and transfers more energy to the ball on impact. That is the reason why spin and tempo are increased when a speed-glued rubber is used.

“When the rubber molecules become taut, the rubber itself distends and becomes larger and softer. The feeling at the point of impact of the ball is intensified. The combination of greater rotation and more feeling means that the player can attain faster topspin, while at the same time feeling more secure.”

...

“The ball was more effectively surrounded by the rubber, and so it was easier to return it with spin after your opponent had hit it, rather than just blocking it,” says Stellan Bengtsson, world singles champion in 1971, who worked as professional coach for a variety of national teams and clubs after ending his playing career.

“The topspin players quickly learned to close the racket angle a bit more and to hit the ball before it reached the highest point of the arc. They no longer needed to reach out so far and were able to start the forehand topspin at hip level. Now you could hit the ball more or less straight on, and not so much from below to above like you did before. And you got lots of power into the shot with far smaller movements.”

...

“Now you could play long service returns and get the opponent to play a topspin stroke. Before the gluing it was a big risk to counter attack by looping the ball back, but now one could counter attack by looping quite safely, comments Jan-Ove Waldner, world singles champion in 1989 and 1997, Olympic singles champion in 1992 and European singles champion in 1996.

“I was now able to get significantly more points back in the court- as did many others,” explains Jörgen Persson, Swedish European singles champion in 1986 and world singles champion in 1991.

Topspin duals began to develop, and speedglue allowed the players to ‘fish’ several metres away from the table, in other words take their time to deliver the ball to the table, and win points in so doing.


Edited by zeio - 11/12/2017 at 12:55am
Viscaria FL - 91g
+ Neo H3 2.15 Blk - 44.5g(55.3g uncut bare)
+ Hexer HD 2.1 Red - 49.3g(68.5g 〃 〃)
= 184.8g
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote richrf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/12/2017 at 12:25am
Thanks Zeio. Great story!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zeio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/12/2017 at 2:22am
However, there is another version of the story that has popped up in China fairly recently. Below is an excerpt.

Quote
  其实,我是化学家

  多米尼克(Dominique Lohest)是法国人,出生在巴黎,现已年过60的他在比利时生活了30多年。打球时最好的排名是比利时第6名,而妻子可是比利时的5届冠军,两个女儿有着令人羡慕的双重国籍。多米尼克曾在法、比两国求学,毕业后在一家化学工厂工作过几年,其后便开了自己的公司(TRF Belgium S.A.)至今。球员显然不是他的终生代号,叫他CEO时他也只是点点欣喜,在整个采访过程中他几次强调,“我是化学家”。

  快速胶水是这样诞生的

  坊间流传着各种版本,多数都与一个人有关——克兰帕尔,他不仅打球是超级天才,传说更是他第一个使用快速胶水,并传遍了欧洲乃至世界。一切与天才有关的故事都有着莫名其妙的说服力,但事实往往出乎意料。

  多米尼克早年在匈牙利的训练中,十分偶然地尝试出了快速胶水。那时候,人们都是粘好了乒乓球板胶皮后几个月都不会撕下来的。有次教练让多米尼克换个球拍,他换了之后立刻发现出球速度快了好多,开始他以为是球板木材的原因,但是几小时后速度又明显下降了。带着疑虑,他多次反复这个过程,终于发现胶水才是真正原因。因为受过专业的化学训练,他对粘合剂进行了色谱分析,标记出了能够膨胀橡胶、增加弹性的化学分子。随后,他研究并发展了这一规律,制造出了适合所有乒乓球员的快速胶水,并创立了公司,为几乎所有主流乒乓品牌供货,成为一代王者,德国人称他为“胶水的国王”。

  上世纪70年代末,多米尼克研制出了快速胶水。近水楼台,当时比利时的球员们是首批受益者,包括年纪尚小的塞弗。通过和约尼尔、克兰帕尔、盖尔盖伊这些成名选手的共同训练与交流,他们也迅速接受了快速胶水。此后,在整个欧洲的推广速度更如同受到了胶水滋润,盖亭、老瓦、罗斯科夫等名将,无一不是灌胶的狂热分子,每场比赛前都得刷刷。中国队则接受较晚,当时看外国球员打完比赛就把海绵撕下来,还以为是打生气了。直至1991年千叶世乒赛,马文革成了国乒第一个吃螃蟹的,还有不少国内教练对刷胶水表示不解。这些人使用的胶水,当然出自多米尼克之手。


(In fact, I'm a chemist

Dominique Lohest is a French born in Paris. Now in his 60s, he has lived in Belgium for over 30 years. His best ranking in Beligum was number 6, and his wife was 5-time Belgium champion, and her two daughters with dual nationality. Dominique studied in France and Belgium. After graduation, he worked for a few years at a chemical factory, before starting his own company(TRF Belgium S.A.) to this date. Apparently, the role of athlete was not the end of road for him, showing his pleasant side when being referred by the CEO title. Still he stressed multiple times during the entire interview, "I'm a chemist."

This is how speed glue came about

Several stories are flowing in the community, most of which all feature one individual - Klampar, who not only is a super talent, but also legend has it he is the first to use speed glue, and spread it all over Europe and across the world. Every story related to prodigy has this mystical, compelling quality, but the reality is often the polar opposite.

Dominique trained in Hungary in his early days, and tried speed glue merely by chance. Back then, people leave their rubbers on the blades for months on end. One time a coach had Dominique change his racket. Right away, he found his shots much faster, and at first he thought it was the blade, but the speed would drop substantially after a few hours. Puzzled, he went through the same process time and time again, and finally realized it was the glue. Geared with his chemical know-how, he performed chromatography on the glue, marking the chemical molecules capable of expanding rubber and increasing elasticity. Afterwards, he researched and developed on this principle, producing a speed glue suitable for table tennis players. He started a company and supplied to all major brands, becoming a leader of a generation, earning him the nickname "King of Glue" among the Germans.

In the late '70s, Dominique invented the speed glue. Proximity means priority. Belgium players were the first beneficiaries, including the young Saive. Through trainings and exchanges, well-known players such as Jonyer, Klampar, Gergely quickly caught on to speed glue. Since then, the speed of adoption across the entire Europe was nourished by "the glue supplement." Gatien, Waldner, Rosskopf et al. were all gluing maniacs who couldn't skip the ceremony before every match. CNT was late to the party(TL's note: confirmed by Jiang Jialiang). When foreign players ripped their rubbers off the blades after matches, the Chinese players thought they did it out of anger. When Ma Wenge became the first Chinese player to get his feet wet at WTTC 1991, many coaches in China were still clueless about gluing. Needless to say, the glue used by those players came from none other than Dominique.)

Edited by zeio - 11/12/2017 at 3:35am
Viscaria FL - 91g
+ Neo H3 2.15 Blk - 44.5g(55.3g uncut bare)
+ Hexer HD 2.1 Red - 49.3g(68.5g 〃 〃)
= 184.8g
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote APW46 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/12/2017 at 3:44am
Speed glue was not developed for table tennis, it is vulcanising glue used in the tyre industry.
The Older I get, The better I was.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zeio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/12/2017 at 3:51am
That's the version most commonly seen on the net in China, it's said Klampar ran out the glue he usually used, and there was a bike shop close to where he trained, so he went and grabbed a bottle of the tire glue and that's how he noticed the effect. From there speed glue was then developed.

Edited by zeio - 11/12/2017 at 3:51am
Viscaria FL - 91g
+ Neo H3 2.15 Blk - 44.5g(55.3g uncut bare)
+ Hexer HD 2.1 Red - 49.3g(68.5g 〃 〃)
= 184.8g
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote richrf Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/12/2017 at 8:08am
Another version I read was that the effect of tire/mechanics glue was accidently discovered by a non-professional and then passed along through clubs. It's possible that is was discovered in multiple ways over a period of time by multiple people. Surbek is also given credit in another story. I guess this mystery will never be solved.

Edited by richrf - 11/12/2017 at 8:09am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Baal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/12/2017 at 8:12am
For years people here bought our speed glue at auto parts stores. Cheaper and better.

Compared to the effect of that stuff, boosting is barely noticeable.
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