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Backhand Against Weak Backspin

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    Posted: 12/13/2017 at 10:55am
It's been awhile since I've posted one of these videos. Hopefully the community can help me again with all your great advice :)

About 2 weeks ago I had the chance to concentrate on my backhand opener. My partner spent 40 minutes feeding me weak underspin balls for me to practice attacking.

Needless to say, my swing had very little consistency and I was struggling to get the right timing and technique to hit a quality ball.

Here is a short segment from the end of the session. Towards the end I felt like I had something good going. Some of the balls felt very high quality.

I still need a lot of practice before I can use it in matches, but before I commit even further to trying to develop this into my fundamental opener, I was hoping you guys would have a look and tell me what you think.

The ones I felt were better are towards the start, and towards the end of the video were ones that felt a little off. Which ones do you think were fundamentally sound? Or if all of them are lacking, what should I concentrate on adding or changing?

Also, I know it's very important to have a relaxed swing, but when I fully relax my arm and wrist, I can never fully utilize the whip of my wrist. Are people applying a bit of force to cock their wrist back, then relaxing as they swing forward? (Hopefully this makes sense. If not, please let me know and I'll try to explain it better)

All comments welcome as usual!! :)



P.S. Sorry about the talking between shots.


Edited by mickd - 12/13/2017 at 10:56am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NextLevel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/13/2017 at 11:45am
In all things related to backspin, start with circular strokes.  Use bigger circles or smaller circles.  Over time, when it comes together, you will develop your own ideal of what to do.
I like putting heavy topspin on the ball...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote zeio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/13/2017 at 12:27pm
The feeds are too short and inconsistent. Tell your partner to feed longer, enough to clear the table by like a foot. Right now the table is in the way, which makes you reach out so much with your arm as if doing the chiquita.

An easier way to feed backspin ball with consistent placement is to let the ball drop once on the feeder's side before pushing it to you.

You know how to involve the knees and trunk, but they are not working in unison. There is a disconnect between the upper- and lower-bodies when initiating the stroke, because there is too much motion. You also don't need to drop your weight and then bounce up so much for light backspin.

Your stroke mechanics is there. Try to keep it more compact. Drop your weight just enough you can feel tension in the quads. Lower your shoulder a little, keep your arm straighter and the elbow closer to your body.

Edited by zeio - 12/13/2017 at 2:45pm
Viscaria FL - 91g
+ Neo H3 2.15 Blk - 44.5g(55.3g uncut bare)
+ Hexer HD 2.1 Red - 49.3g(68.5g 〃 〃)
= 184.8g
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zeio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/13/2017 at 2:41pm
https://youtu.be/HTHwbKPeYpc


Skip to 1:00, where Guo Yunpeng starts the demo, highlighting the points above, e.g. keeping the stroke compact, so that the force is more concentrated and to increase consistency.

https://youtu.be/EjEqH5OrMrA


In this tutorial by Yuan Yixing, he highlights the straighter arm and the closer elbow position, around 2:27-3:00, he starts demoing the not-to-dos.

Edited by zeio - 12/13/2017 at 2:46pm
Viscaria FL - 91g
+ Neo H3 2.15 Blk - 44.5g(55.3g uncut bare)
+ Hexer HD 2.1 Red - 49.3g(68.5g 〃 〃)
= 184.8g
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote smackman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/13/2017 at 4:12pm
I would watch black and pink shirts as they do it every backhand opener
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote blahness Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/13/2017 at 4:40pm
The wrist and forearm action is correct which is great! Next step is to involve your upper arm and the whole body. The trick which I have already mentioned in your previous thread is to lead with the elbow. Put your elbow solidly in front of your body during your backswing, this will force you to rotate your waist and shift some weight to your right leg to achieve it, then pull your elbow towards the left to lead the stroke. You don't seem to have any elbow pull right now which is why there's no oomph behind the shot.

Watch the top BH players (Ovtcharov, Zhang Jike, Fan Zhendong), and note their elbow position during the backswing and after the stroke, you will notice the elbow leads the stroke and does not stay stationary.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mickd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/14/2017 at 3:07am
Thank you for all the replies, everyone!

@NextLevel A little more of a description would be greatly appreciated :) By circular stroke, do you mean closing of the racket as you swing? Creating a circle with your elbow as the pivot?

@zeio Just to confirm, keeping my elbow closer to my body and having my arm straighter would mean having my arm start like close to straight down? Guo Yunpeng's demonstration of a more compact swing was very easy to see. I can't figure out the part Yuan Yixing talks about it. At the moment I've been sticking my elbow further out so that I can have a bigger backswing (with my hand starting well behind my elbow, if that makes sense)!

@smackman Oh trust me, I've seen their openers many many times lol! Sometimes seeing isn't enough to figure sometime out :( Maybe that's just me though...

@blahness Thanks man. I think I get what you mean. I just tried some shadow strokes of it. I feel like this is the type of thing that is ideal, but the moment I try to add it in, my whole stroke will fall apart.. Practice, practice, practice, I guess! Awhile back a very high level Chinese player gave me some tips, and in his case he recommended me to get the arm action right, then add the body in. Maybe my swing (at least in this video) is at a point where I need to concentrate more on using my body.


Anyone have any input about bending your wrist back? I'm wondering if this is supposed to be achieved purely from being relaxed (which is what people always say, but it feels impossible since if I was fully relaxed, my wrist would just dangle down a little and never point towards my stomach). Or maybe I should just do the stroke without trying to have my wrist point back?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote balldance Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/14/2017 at 3:47am
My thoughts:

- Your partner's pushes must be longer (and a little lower if possible). In the video, you needed to step forward to hit the ball, not really a good way to learn the basic stroke. Ideally, you or him serve backspin, he push the ball back to you long and low, you wait for the ball to come and hit it instead of stepping forward.

- Your wrist problem: It's about having the right combination of relax and control. People said about relaxing your wrist but it's not 100% relaxed. You still need to have some control. There are different levels of relax/stiffness
100% relaxed -> relaxed + controlled (perfect combination) -> 100% controlled -> tight/stiff
You need to find the balance. Won't be easy. It will take time.

- I don't think you need to make the stroke too compact at the moment. You can use full swing (large stroke) to learn the mechanics first. The short/compact stroke requires explosive power generation, not easy to learn if you don't get the mechanics first.

- For me, this stroke starts from the legs and hip, without the power/momentum you get from them, your swing will be inconsistent and have no power. So, when the ball comes, drag your forearm down, the racket point down (or down and a little towards your stomach), tighten your leg muscle, use your legs and hip to transfer the body weight upward and from left to right, this can be very short motion but it gives the momentum to your swing. Then start swinging your forearm upward, left to right, keeping your elbow pretty static (not 100%, you can't anyway, but you shouldn't swing it)

Let's do this shadow practice to get the mechanics, imagine you are doing the BH topspin, your elbow forward, wrist/racket points down, forearm relaxed, do every step unless the arm swing. When you use your legs and hip to transfer the bodyweight correctly, you can see your arm moving upward and left to right even if you don't swing it. Practice it hundreds of times, then add a little arm swing, you get the perfect stroke.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote blahness Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/14/2017 at 5:35am
Originally posted by mickd mickd wrote:

Thank you for all the replies, everyone!

@NextLevel A little more of a description would be greatly appreciated :) By circular stroke, do you mean closing of the racket as you swing? Creating a circle with your elbow as the pivot?

@zeio Just to confirm, keeping my elbow closer to my body and having my arm straighter would mean having my arm start like close to straight down? Guo Yunpeng's demonstration of a more compact swing was very easy to see. I can't figure out the part Yuan Yixing talks about it. At the moment I've been sticking my elbow further out so that I can have a bigger backswing (with my hand starting well behind my elbow, if that makes sense)!

@smackman Oh trust me, I've seen their openers many many times lol! Sometimes seeing isn't enough to figure sometime out :( Maybe that's just me though...

@blahness Thanks man. I think I get what you mean. I just tried some shadow strokes of it. I feel like this is the type of thing that is ideal, but the moment I try to add it in, my whole stroke will fall apart.. Practice, practice, practice, I guess! Awhile back a very high level Chinese player gave me some tips, and in his case he recommended me to get the arm action right, then add the body in. Maybe my swing (at least in this video) is at a point where I need to concentrate more on using my body.


Anyone have any input about bending your wrist back? I'm wondering if this is supposed to be achieved purely from being relaxed (which is what people always say, but it feels impossible since if I was fully relaxed, my wrist would just dangle down a little and never point towards my stomach). Or maybe I should just do the stroke without trying to have my wrist point back?

Your wrist pointing back can only be achieved if you have your shoulder and elbow in front of your body, which is what I've always been talking about....Wink Don't worry about your stroke breaking down, just go for it...
 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote NextLevel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/14/2017 at 9:34am
Originally posted by mickd mickd wrote:

Thank you for all the replies, everyone!

@NextLevel A little more of a description would be greatly appreciated :) By circular stroke, do you mean closing of the racket as you swing? Creating a circle with your elbow as the pivot?


Anyone have any input about bending your wrist back? I'm wondering if this is supposed to be achieved purely from being relaxed (which is what people always say, but it feels impossible since if I was fully relaxed, my wrist would just dangle down a little and never point towards my stomach). Or maybe I should just do the stroke without trying to have my wrist point back?

Creating a circular path with your racket trajectory with your swing.  It could include all the advice that you have been given or your own invention.  IT could be circular around the shoulder/upper arm, circular around the elbow, circular with the wrist accentuation, circular in the use of your hips.  Just draw a circle round the ball with your racket and brush it,  I find that sometimes, too much advice makes it hard to focus on what aspects of the stroke are essential.  And when looping backspin, it is even more critical to turn the ball than it is when looping topspin, where the imprecision of a hit can still get lucky.  IF you learn the the safety of a circular stroke, then you can focus on more aggressive options later.  OR maybe not - I still largely loop using circles to guide my stroke when approaching backspin.
  
In practice, most people looping backspin (especially chop) corkscrew the ball, so the circular stroke usually hooks or fades the ball.  IT's rarely ever pure topspin in matches.  You could drive the ball with this circular stroke but start with pure brush and then for weak topspin, use a lower but circular swing trajectory.  The most critical thing is to have your racket turning round the ball as fast as possible on the contact point you have chosen to maximize the spin you apply to the ball.

Bending the wrist back and having it just dangle is fine.  HAving it point towards your stomach is fine too.  Having it point down relative to how you feel is fine and is probably the most practical thing at your level and it is probably still how I loop chop from my backswing with my backhand.  I know a coach who teaches looping backspin with the backhand by advising students to drop the wrist downards at the end of the backswing and I often do too.  

These strokes can be technically improved over time by fixing the form as long as you get the essence of what you are doing right.  I think as long as the wrist is adding to the speed of the swing, and isn't doing so by you using your muscles to force it but by mostly a back and forth reflexive jerk/snap in the fingers, all is well.

I looped backspin for a long time using my forearm and core but just basing my swing on the general circular concept.  I wouldn't lose any sleep over details as long as the general form is right.  You aren't a pro player, you just want something that is generally correct and that will grow with you as you grow as a player.


Edited by NextLevel - 12/14/2017 at 9:38am
I like putting heavy topspin on the ball...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zeio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/14/2017 at 1:33pm
Originally posted by mickd mickd wrote:

@zeio Just to confirm, keeping my elbow closer to my body and having my arm straighter would mean having my arm start like close to straight down? Guo Yunpeng's demonstration of a more compact swing was very easy to see. I can't figure out the part Yuan Yixing talks about it. At the moment I've been sticking my elbow further out so that I can have a bigger backswing (with my hand starting well behind my elbow, if that makes sense)!

Straighter was a poor word choice, rather, your arm could be less bent. I think that the table getting in the way is the cause.

The essence of the stroke has little to do with the backswing or the elbow, the key actually lies in the upper arm.

In the animated gif below, there is little backswing in my stroke. My elbow is also kept at an obtuse angle throughout the stroke. By lowering my arm, I've already created enough distance to accelerate my racket. All I do to initiate the stroke is rotate around my upper arm. It's basically an application of Yuan's demonstration from 2:06-2:25.

I will try to translate the keypoints of both videos.



Edited by zeio - 12/14/2017 at 2:26pm
Viscaria FL - 91g
+ Neo H3 2.15 Blk - 44.5g(55.3g uncut bare)
+ Hexer HD 2.1 Red - 49.3g(68.5g 〃 〃)
= 184.8g
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote APW46 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/14/2017 at 3:33pm
 Any Stroke against any spin variation is not really a technical issue once decent technique is established. It is about reading the spin and applying the variations within the learned technique.
The more proficient you are at the given technique, the more equipped you will be at applying the correct angle of address to the ball on contact. 
This comes from your perception of the incoming balls spin, The way that you can get so much better at this is to play loads and loads, that is why better players are better at it, because they have played loads and loads. what ever you do, If you do it a lot you get better at it. I feel like I have just summed up everything in TT coaching lol.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NextLevel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/14/2017 at 4:12pm
Originally posted by APW46 APW46 wrote:

 Any Stroke against any spin variation is not really a technical issue once decent technique is established. It is about reading the spin and applying the variations within the learned technique.
The more proficient you are at the given technique, the more equipped you will be at applying the correct angle of address to the ball on contact. 
This comes from your perception of the incoming balls spin, The way that you can get so much better at this is to play loads and loads, that is why better players are better at it, because they have played loads and loads. what ever you do, If you do it a lot you get better at it. I feel like I have just summed up everything in TT coaching lol.

You almost have - this is my current philosophy as well.  It is too common to try to copy a certain stroke down to the T while as long as the general swing checks the box, the rest is application to the incoming spin with multiple reps.  Sure, much better players have physical and in some cases technical advantages, but most of us are trying to be reasonably more proficient, not world class.
I like putting heavy topspin on the ball...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mickd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/15/2017 at 2:33am
Thanks, everyone.

@NL My partner often tells me to try and go over the top of the ball more, and not be afraid of failing to lift the ball, since that generally isn't the issue. I think maybe thinking like that does help create the more circular stroke.

@zeio It looks like both you and Yuan go up a lot more than forward with the stroke? Maybe I'm trying too hard to go forward with the stroke? So having a straighter arm would be like having the arm drop lower? When you say rotating around your upper arm, do you mean with your elbow as the pivot? It looks like that in Yuan's video, but I'm not sure if you mean your upper arm closer to where your shoulder is? And if you have time for the translate of some of it, that would be super :)

@APW46 & NL I completely agree that most of it comes down to having enough practice time! My hope is just that by thinking more about these things while not practicing at the table, I'll be more aware at the table so I can maximise my improvement :) For me it comes down to, if I wasn't doing this, and from the beginning just practiced normally like most club players, would I be as strong as I am now? Or weaker? Or stronger? If stronger, than I guess I've failed haha.

Also, I think I just might be more of an analytical player (in terms of mechanics, I still suck at strategy hehe), and being someone who trains juniors, and would like to continue to help young players improve to the best of my ability, I'm trying to prioritize technique and form just a little more, even if it compromises my level a little. In the long run though, it should always be worth it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zeio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/15/2017 at 11:39am
Originally posted by mickd mickd wrote:

@zeio It looks like both you and Yuan go up a lot more than forward with the stroke? Maybe I'm trying too hard to go forward with the stroke? So having a straighter arm would be like having the arm drop lower? When you say rotating around your upper arm, do you mean with your elbow as the pivot? It looks like that in Yuan's video, but I'm not sure if you mean your upper arm closer to where your shoulder is? And if you have time for the translate of some of it, that would be super :)

When I started out, I was also puzzled about the stroke seemingly going up more than it does forward, with some CNT coaches even describing it as going horizontal(橫向發力, literally exerting force sideways.) A less common but in my opinion better description would be "to trace out the arc(畫弧)." I found it easier to focus on that and adjust the path for the level of spin.

As for the straighter arm/lower arm drop, check out Oh Sangeun's backspin opener below. That would be how the stroke looks from the side. The elbow should stay in front of the upper body but it doesn't have to stick out that much. Yes, do use the elbow as the pivot to rotate the upper arm.



And the accompanying instructions:
Quote 反手起下旋球
  用反手拉对方的下旋来球是最重要的进攻技术之一。要想提高拉球的质量必须要掌握反手拉球的要点:击球前,要充分压低身体重心,两腿弯曲的幅度比较大。转腰的同时,肩膀向前顶,肘部指向身体外侧,加大手腕内收的幅度,使拍头指向自己的腹部(图1-图3),将大臂肌肉收紧(图4)。击球时,前臂外展,球拍的拍头向前转动,用以制造旋转和提高拉球速度。

  做好充分的引拍动作,大臂肌肉要有收紧的感觉
  反手拉下旋来球时的引拍动作十分重要。转腰时,肩膀向前顶,肘部指向身体外侧,这样的引拍动作可以增大球拍与来球之间的距离,击球时更容易发力。另外,为了提高反手拉球的威力和稳定性,向后引拍时,大臂要有“收紧”的感觉,这样可以保证动作不易变形,使拉球动作更加流畅。

  膝盖弯曲,腰部下沉,球拍放低
  反手起下旋球与反手拉上旋来球相比,引拍时膝盖更为弯曲、腰部更为下沉,这样就可以使球拍的位置更低,有助于向前上方发力。同时,放低重心可以使下半身更加稳定。
  很多乒乓球爱好者在反手拉球时很难用上全身的力量,甚至在来球时身体会失去平衡,这是由于他们的腿部力量和腹肌、背肌的力量不足,因此加强相关部位的肌肉力量是提高拉球质量的前提。
Viscaria FL - 91g
+ Neo H3 2.15 Blk - 44.5g(55.3g uncut bare)
+ Hexer HD 2.1 Red - 49.3g(68.5g 〃 〃)
= 184.8g
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote zeio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/15/2017 at 1:43pm
Here comes the (lost in) translation!

In Guo Yunpeng's video,

@0:57, he points out the stroke of the person in question should be smaller to get the force more concentrated.

@1:04, when starting out, it's best to keep the stroke compact. Focus on lifting the ball by using the wrist to brush up.

@1:23, keep a loose(TL's note: but not lax) wrist and "brush it off."

@1:27, the don'ts.

@1:33, keep the force concentrated to a point. No need for large stroke, which causes inconsistency.

@2:35, keep a loose wrist.

@2:41, the don'ts again.

In Yuan Yixing's video,

@0:18, on backspin opener, the 1st part is to overcome the spin. To do that, you need to touch the bottom half of the ball, such that your backswing starts lower than the incoming ball, with the racket angle slightly open.

@0:34, the contact for backhand loop is similar in that regard. The racket angle for a push is slighly open, with the wrist tilted upward(TL's note: radial deviation) during the backswing. For backhand loop, the wrist is tilted downward(TL's note: ulnar deviation.)

@0:55, demo for the contact point.

@1:22, the 2nd part is to hone the feel for transient brushing. For that, you need to lower the wrist. Then upon the swing, the forearm leads the wrist to swing forward and upward(TL's note: supination of the forearm and external rotation of the shoulder.) During the swing, the racket starts with a slighly open angle and ends with a closed angle.

@2:06, demo. Go easy when starting off. Get familiar with the brushing sensation. Two common mistakes: 1. stroke goes straight forward, leading to a no-spin block. 2. flip of the wrist too quick, resulting in no-spin balls. 3. use the trunk to lead the arm when swinging. Lower the trunk during the backswing. Drop the weight. Then go upward and forward with the swing. Do not just lower the arm.

@4:04, demo. Keep a small distance between ball and racket when starting out. Train that brushing sensation. Get the body in unison. Keep in mind of the common mistakes as mentioned - lower the arm but not the trunk. That will affect your ability to control the arc of the ball as well as the swing. Another mistake. When swinging, it's easy for the upper body to lean backward. This usually means your stance is too close to the table. Take a step back to give yourself more space.

@5:24, 4. training for the impact point. In other words, stroke and footwork working in unison. For backhand loop, only if your feet are in position, can you complete the stroke.

@5:55, student demo. Start off with fixed-point feeds. Regardless of consistent ball feeds, you should still take some mini-steps. Say at that point, you should still do a little hop and then recover. Do not plant your feet.

@7:00, second training - lateral movement. Use the two-step(并步) to move left and right.

@7:20, student demo. To the left first, then right. Once familiar, mix it up. Then, 1/2 table multi-point.

@8:20, another point is moving back. For deeper balls, you must back off. Use the backward step(后撤步), also called backward two-step(后并步). Student demo.

@9:15, when backing off, use the ball of the foot to hop, to find the impact point and recover.

@9:50, 5. adjustment training, which is about adjusting for the different spin. You can feed one with spin and one with no spin.

@10:47, points to consider when training - 1. racket angle. More open for stronger spin. Keep it closer, otherwise. 2. for stronger spin, swing a little more upward. For no-spin balls, swing forward more. Another point about looping into the net. I want to stress that for those, the reason is actually not the due to the strong spin. Rather, it's due to the depth of the ball, when you go up, the short arc of the ball is what causes it to catch the net. Make the distinction. Is it from the spin, or is it from the short arc?

@11:57, those are the two points for backhand adjustment. Remember to go upward and forward, regardless of spin or no-spin. Don't just go straight. Trace an arc. Only if you trace an arc, can you spin. No arc, no spin. Spin and consistency go down. Keep that in mind.

@12:48, once familiar, add the training for spin judgment. You can feed randomly, then to train for adjustment.

@13:13, for spin judgment, look for where the ball hit on the racket, top or bottom. Whether the force is directed downward to brush, or forward to push(TL's note: literal sense.) Once mature, the 6th part is to increase the shot quality. For backhand, there are 3 parts. 1st - 快拉, literally quick loop, essentially off-the-bounce loop - focused on speed and spin. 2nd - spinny loop - focused on spin. 3rd - powerloop - loops that are focused on foward momentum with a certain amount of spin.

@14:20, for quick loop, say when receving, you get a topspin or backspin kick serve deep to the endline. For this ball, there is not enough time to back off. It's easy to get jammed. That's where you use the quick loop. Or, if your stance is close to the table, the other player sends a deep shot over. You may use the quick loop for that.

@14:56, demo. 1st, when playing the quick loop, contact off-the-bounce. 2nd, use small backswing to avoid getting jammed. 3rd, forearm and wrist must accelerate in an instant.

@16:04, for the spinny loop, use it for handling backspin balls that call for caution like tight score or when you're not certain of the spin.

@16:28, demo. Give yourself more space. Lower the trunk. Bite into the rubber. Larger backswing. Swing upward and foward. Start from down low to increase bite. Contact when the ball is falling.

@17:18, for powerloop, for handling pop-ups, low-quality balls, or if you're certain of the spin.

@17:59, for this shot, racket angle should be kept closer, to keep a low arc. Draw racket more to the back, less downward. Swing forward. Contact should consist of hitting and brushing.

That's it!

Edited by zeio - 12/15/2017 at 1:45pm
Viscaria FL - 91g
+ Neo H3 2.15 Blk - 44.5g(55.3g uncut bare)
+ Hexer HD 2.1 Red - 49.3g(68.5g 〃 〃)
= 184.8g
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mickd View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mickd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/16/2017 at 9:13pm
Thanks for taking the time to translate the video, zeio. I'll watch it again with the translation :) I can actually speak Chinese, but only at a conversational level. I don't understand the table tennis terms haha. 
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Lightzy View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lightzy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/17/2017 at 11:43pm
Hi I saw your video on the first post and I think something that will help you a lot is to extend or non-racket arm forward to be in line with the racket hand.
This will force your body into position and you won't miss the contact like on the third shot on the video.

You already do it but if you do it more, like when you practice backhand-flick against short serve, this will help establish the best body position and contact point
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