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    Posted: 11/11/2023 at 4:13am
Hello,

I'm thinking of trying an all-wood blade to re-find my touch and work a bit more on the basics (looping game). 

Korbel seems like an obvious choice - do you know what the straight handle is like? I'm looking for a chunky straight handle, at least the size of primorac carbon.

Are there any other alternative all-wood blades suitable for a looping game with a big ST handle?

Thanks
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NextLevel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/11/2023 at 3:37pm
Try the Bernadette Szocs Signature 1. It's a 7ply but it is clearly more modern in its orientation and a bit flexible.  Not as stiff as a clipper. 
I like putting heavy topspin on the ball...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Slowhand Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/12/2023 at 2:53pm
Samsonov Force Pro black has a big ST handle. Excellent looping blade.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote darkmoor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/12/2023 at 4:37pm
The classic Korbel had a thin handle. Thenopposit is Korbel SK7, at least the old version, which comes with a thick handle 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NextLevel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/12/2023 at 10:52pm
Originally posted by Slowhand Slowhand wrote:

Samsonov Force Pro black has a big ST handle. Excellent looping blade.

The Szocs signature 1 and the Force Pro black are similar in many respects including handle design.
I like putting heavy topspin on the ball...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote doraemon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/13/2023 at 1:55am
You want similar blade to BTY Korbel (which has thin handle)?   You want ST handle on Korbel?

First, it is hard to get Korbel with ST handle.   Unless you order from Japan or Korea (if I recall correctly).  

You want something similar to Korbel but has thick ST handle?

Then try Tibhar Stratus Power Wood (SPW).   It has thick ST handle.   Its composition is limba - limba - ayous - limba - limba, exactly like Korbel.

The head size is also as big as Korbel, 158 x 152 mm

The only difference is that SPW has thickness of 6.2 mm, while Korbel is only 5.9 mm.  This affects the playing characteristics:  SPW is stiffer yet a bit softer compared to Korbel.  Korbel is a better looping blade IMHO.

The other blade similar to both Korbel and SPW (in term of composition) is Xiom Offensive S.   The head size is standard, 157 x 150 mm and the thickness is 6.1 mm.   So it is in between Korbel and SPW.   But with smaller head size, it is stiffer and the feeling is harder.

EDIT:
When I said it is hard to get ST handle, I am referring to Korbel made in Japan.  If you get European made Korbel (Hungary?) you can get FL, ST and AN as well.   But quality wise, Japanese Korbel is the one you should get.


Edited by doraemon - 11/13/2023 at 1:58am
Blade : Just wood
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Stavros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/13/2023 at 2:50am
Blade: Stiga Infinity
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote monkey401 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/14/2023 at 6:47pm
I am familiar with Korbel, samsonov force pro black, and Bernadette blade. I’ve used all three in the past year. All three blades have very good touch and feel. Korbel is the flexiest but it does lack stability with the current ball. You can’t go wrong with either but for the new ball, I’d go with Bernadette or SFPB. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote darkmoor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/14/2023 at 6:49pm
what do you mean by stability with the new ball?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote doraemon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/14/2023 at 7:37pm
Originally posted by darkmoor darkmoor wrote:

what do you mean by stability with the new ball?

Allow me to answer this.

I have Korbel, Force Pro Blue, Force Pro Black, etc.

Korbel is a good looping blade.   In the era of 38 mm and 40 mm ball, it is still a good blade, used by many pro players.  In the 40+ plastic ball era, it is still good for us mere mortal.   However, being a rather flexy blade (which is good for looping), it is OK only for blocking or flat hitting (smashing).  For excellent blocking or flat hitting, you need a more stable blade (i.e. stiffer blade) such as Force Pro Black or Clipper or Falck W7.

Don't get me wrong, Korbel is still OK for blocking and smashing, it is just easier with stiffer blades mentioned above.   I think that what he meant by "stability".

I hope it helps.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote darkmoor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/14/2023 at 8:01pm
Originally posted by doraemon doraemon wrote:

Originally posted by darkmoor darkmoor wrote:

what do you mean by stability with the new ball?

Allow me to answer this.

I have Korbel, Force Pro Blue, Force Pro Black, etc.

Korbel is a good looping blade.   In the era of 38 mm and 40 mm ball, it is still a good blade, used by many pro players.  In the 40+ plastic ball era, it is still good for us mere mortal.   However, being a rather flexy blade (which is good for looping), it is OK only for blocking or flat hitting (smashing).  For excellent blocking or flat hitting, you need a more stable blade (i.e. stiffer blade) such as Force Pro Black or Clipper or Falck W7.

Don't get me wrong, Korbel is still OK for blocking and smashing, it is just easier with stiffer blades mentioned above.   I think that what he meant by "stability".

I hope it helps.

I just wonder how was that any different with old celluloid ball, except they were faster 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote doraemon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/14/2023 at 9:02pm
Given the same blade, let's say Acoustic, it was good during the small ball and 40 mm ball era.  However, with the 40+ mm plastic ball, the feeling is that it is too flexible, thus harder to block or smash.   It is just a feeling during strong impact of the ball onto the blade.

Can you still use it?  Of course, it is just harder to smash the ball.   I feel that in the 40+ plastic ball era, people have less respect for slow heavy loop.   They can just smack the ball.   During the 38 mm ball era, you have to be more precise as the spin was a lot heavier.   I also used to loop all the time, now I loop once or twice and prefer to smash the ball.  Thus I need a blade with more stability, i.e. stiffer or has bigger sweetspot.

Same with Clipper.   I could not use Clipper during the 38 mm ball era.  It felt too stiff, hard to loop.  Now with the plastic ball (40+) I feel that Clipper is good.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NextLevel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/14/2023 at 10:06pm
Originally posted by darkmoor darkmoor wrote:

Originally posted by doraemon doraemon wrote:

Originally posted by darkmoor darkmoor wrote:

what do you mean by stability with the new ball?

Allow me to answer this.

I have Korbel, Force Pro Blue, Force Pro Black, etc.

Korbel is a good looping blade.   In the era of 38 mm and 40 mm ball, it is still a good blade, used by many pro players.  In the 40+ plastic ball era, it is still good for us mere mortal.   However, being a rather flexy blade (which is good for looping), it is OK only for blocking or flat hitting (smashing).  For excellent blocking or flat hitting, you need a more stable blade (i.e. stiffer blade) such as Force Pro Black or Clipper or Falck W7.

Don't get me wrong, Korbel is still OK for blocking and smashing, it is just easier with stiffer blades mentioned above.   I think that what he meant by "stability".

I hope it helps.

I just wonder how was that any different with old celluloid ball, except they were faster 

Since I am a big Korbel fan and have now left it for faster all Wood and composite blades, I will answer as well and my position is similar to the what doraemon wrote - the old school thin OFF- or slower 5-ply blades are really hard to get good blocks with with the plastic ball, and I am confident that the blocking differences between those blades and 7ply and other composite blades are significant enough that I would not start training anyone with a 5 ply anymore, I would look for one of the slower 7 plies.  Is it work, yes, but the right coaching to adjust body usage and grip pressure is more important than using a slower blade.  The Korbel is still a good blade, but the relative thinness and the soft outer ply and the larger head size leads to a degree of flex when blocking that if one wants to graduate to a faster composite blade, one will have to develop new blocking skills.  The only time I might recommend the older all wood 5 plies is if you are using pips or something like that.

I would prefer that one start with a reasonable 7-ply or if a 5-ply, the Mazunov is discontinued.  The Butterfly Hadraw is also a good blade even if expensive and quick.  But I am very confident that the Szocs Signature 1 is a good blade to use, not as stiff as the Force Pro Black, but still pretty good.  I am not a fan of the cheap construction, hollow handle and quality of the Stratus Powerwood (I broke 3 of them when I used it a lot), but if you like it go for it.

The new balls are heavier and they do not ping of your racket as quickly so you need something stiffer to get them moving.  But this is my opinion, I used to struggle to use quick composite blades, but I have used them much more easily with the new balls, albeit with hybrid rubbers.


Edited by NextLevel - 11/14/2023 at 10:08pm
I like putting heavy topspin on the ball...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote monkey401 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/17/2023 at 6:40am
The above comments reflect how I feel about the Korbel with stability. I think Korbel is still 80% good for current ball - especially for training your strokes. But sometimes you wish it didn’t flex as much and had more stability for blocking powerful shots. 

Edited by monkey401 - 11/17/2023 at 6:48am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote stiltt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/17/2023 at 11:43am
The Nittaku Violin is the best blocking blade I have ever tried. I didn't think it was losing any of its blocking capabilities with the plastic ball however it is highly probable that in my USATT 1800 +- 200 range, I was not receiving the kind of shots that would make the difference shine.

I used the Violoncello for a year and with its larger head, it absorbs shocks better and loops divine, that's where I would go first if it is possible to thicken the handle to your taste.

Start with this asking TT11 to chose a 85g weight:

Then, add as much grip to thicken your handle even more, the feel remains alright. I used Wilson tennis grip when I used to wrap my handles, it's light, soft and grippy. One of the 3 rolls can cover 2 handles.

From your stance, I would contact SDC and commission a Nittaku Violin clone with a 162x152 larger head. If you tell SDC you want to keep it simple, you will let him choose the wood for the handle so he has an easier time to achieve the balance and final weight of your choice.


Edited by stiltt - 11/17/2023 at 11:43am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote darkmoor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/20/2023 at 7:32am
Originally posted by NextLevel NextLevel wrote:

Originally posted by darkmoor darkmoor wrote:

Originally posted by doraemon doraemon wrote:

Originally posted by darkmoor darkmoor wrote:

what do you mean by stability with the new ball?

Allow me to answer this.

I have Korbel, Force Pro Blue, Force Pro Black, etc.

Korbel is a good looping blade.   In the era of 38 mm and 40 mm ball, it is still a good blade, used by many pro players.  In the 40+ plastic ball era, it is still good for us mere mortal.   However, being a rather flexy blade (which is good for looping), it is OK only for blocking or flat hitting (smashing).  For excellent blocking or flat hitting, you need a more stable blade (i.e. stiffer blade) such as Force Pro Black or Clipper or Falck W7.

Don't get me wrong, Korbel is still OK for blocking and smashing, it is just easier with stiffer blades mentioned above.   I think that what he meant by "stability".

I hope it helps.

I just wonder how was that any different with old celluloid ball, except they were faster 

Since I am a big Korbel fan and have now left it for faster all Wood and composite blades, I will answer as well and my position is similar to the what doraemon wrote - the old school thin OFF- or slower 5-ply blades are really hard to get good blocks with with the plastic ball, and I am confident that the blocking differences between those blades and 7ply and other composite blades are significant enough that I would not start training anyone with a 5 ply anymore, I would look for one of the slower 7 plies.  Is it work, yes, but the right coaching to adjust body usage and grip pressure is more important than using a slower blade.  The Korbel is still a good blade, but the relative thinness and the soft outer ply and the larger head size leads to a degree of flex when blocking that if one wants to graduate to a faster composite blade, one will have to develop new blocking skills.  The only time I might recommend the older all wood 5 plies is if you are using pips or something like that.

I would prefer that one start with a reasonable 7-ply or if a 5-ply, the Mazunov is discontinued.  The Butterfly Hadraw is also a good blade even if expensive and quick.  But I am very confident that the Szocs Signature 1 is a good blade to use, not as stiff as the Force Pro Black, but still pretty good.  I am not a fan of the cheap construction, hollow handle and quality of the Stratus Powerwood (I broke 3 of them when I used it a lot), but if you like it go for it.

The new balls are heavier and they do not ping of your racket as quickly so you need something stiffer to get them moving.  But this is my opinion, I used to struggle to use quick composite blades, but I have used them much more easily with the new balls, albeit with hybrid rubbers.

With all honesty, for anyone wanting to learn to play table tennis the modern way, they should always put more emphasis on looping and counter looping than blocking. It is harder to master but definitely very effective with a blade like Korbel. Another obvious benefit of Korbel to beginner players, in contrast to 7-ply blades like Force pro BE, is that Korbel is generally  significantly slower hence more controllable on shots where you don't utilize is flexible nature. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NextLevel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/20/2023 at 8:15am
The beauty of this sport is that everyone can have their own opinions on how to develop a player.  As long as the player turns out well, all is good.  I am sure there is someone out there who might argue that the best way to develop a player is to start them on sandpaper or hard bat so they develop good footwork...

In any case, when someone is talking about blocking, one doesn't necessarily mean flat blocking.  The same is broadly true for topspin or kick blocking, it is easier to execute with a slightly stiffer blade.  Some related topics include the choice of rubber.  The main point is that taking strokes that are large (too much upper arm) to compensate for blade slowness is possible and so is gripping the racket too tightly to compensate for inadequate rebound.

I remember when someone on TTD argued that the reason why you use a slower blade is that you like to generate your own power.  Fan Zhendong is arguably the most powerful player on the world. Maybe Dima or Ionescu or Jorgic amongst Europeans.  None of those guys are using all wood blades now though and they are all some of the most powerful players in the world.  The flip side is that they also have some of the best touch or feeling in the world as well. 

The main benefit of using a slower and relatively less stiff blade is that contact and feeling errors are easier to detect given the vibration frequencies and the lower rebound when you hit the bal outside the sweet spot.  It is also easier to pl lay some touch and defensive shots because of this lack of rebound.  But if someone wants to learn modern table tennis, it is not entirely clear this is a good thing as there is a possibility that they hold the paddle too tightly to get power when they should be practicing different levels of grip pressure/stiffness to improve their touch.

Ultimately develop a player, including yourself, how you choose.  But there is no one size fits approach to this. But I definitely think with the new ball, the Korbel doesn't block like the kinds of offensive blades that a player will want to ultimately use and the faster tou can develop a player to use technique that those blades accommodate,  the better.  That said, there are many good players who use a Korbel. In the end, you just use what you want to use. 

The Szocs Sig 1 is slower than the FBPE. Strictly speaking. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote darkmoor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/20/2023 at 9:13am
Originally posted by NextLevel NextLevel wrote:

The beauty of this sport is that everyone can have their own opinions on how to develop a player.  As long as the player turns out well, all is good.  I am sure there is someone out there who might argue that the best way to develop a player is to start them on sandpaper or hard bat so they develop good footwork...

In any case, when someone is talking about blocking, one doesn't necessarily mean flat blocking.  The same is broadly true for topspin or kick blocking, it is easier to execute with a slightly stiffer blade.  Some related topics include the choice of rubber.  The main point is that taking strokes that are large (too much upper arm) to compensate for blade slowness is possible and so is gripping the racket too tightly to compensate for inadequate rebound.

I remember when someone on TTD argued that the reason why you use a slower blade is that you like to generate your own power.  Fan Zhendong is arguably the most powerful player on the world. Maybe Dima or Ionescu or Jorgic amongst Europeans.  None of those guys are using all wood blades now though and they are all some of the most powerful players in the world.  The flip side is that they also have some of the best touch or feeling in the world as well. 

The main benefit of using a slower and relatively less stiff blade is that contact and feeling errors are easier to detect given the vibration frequencies and the lower rebound when you hit the bal outside the sweet spot.  It is also easier to pl lay some touch and defensive shots because of this lack of rebound.  But if someone wants to learn modern table tennis, it is not entirely clear this is a good thing as there is a possibility that they hold the paddle too tightly to get power when they should be practicing different levels of grip pressure/stiffness to improve their touch.

Ultimately develop a player, including yourself, how you choose.  But there is no one size fits approach to this. But I definitely think with the new ball, the Korbel doesn't block like the kinds of offensive blades that a player will want to ultimately use and the faster tou can develop a player to use technique that those blades accommodate,  the better.  That said, there are many good players who use a Korbel. In the end, you just use what you want to use. 

The Szocs Sig 1 is slower than the FBPE. Strictly speaking. 

I honestly never heard of the term topspin/kick blocking. It's possible there's such thing as I need to educate myswlf more about it, bur it's also possible you are referring to is a counter top spin with a slight upwards motion either on forehand or backhand side. I think it is the most used type of stroke in modern table tennis when it comes backhand to backhand rallies. And besides that, as all topspin strokes, it is easier to.do.it with more flexible blade. Played with Korbel before and also with Korbel SK7 before that, and I had more room for error when doing counterloop backhand drills off the bounce, although I know it is always tricky to compare different blades

Regarding slower blades in relation to being able to generate your own power, I believe the flexibility is an important factor. Blades that are flexible give you big increase in speed when you hit hard enough, so they may be quite slow in general but still useful in today's game like in case of Korbel blade. We can all see Gionis hitting powerful winters from mid distance using his Korbel. Stiff, thicker blades, in contrast, can hoffer easier speed buildup, but the difference between 'normal' speed and speed from hitting hard is not so big, and a generally slower but more flexible blade can outperform the stiffer one when you go for that strong loop.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mykonos96 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/20/2023 at 12:16pm
Originally posted by darkmoor darkmoor wrote:

Originally posted by NextLevel NextLevel wrote:

The beauty of this sport is that everyone can have their own opinions on how to develop a player.  As long as the player turns out well, all is good.  I am sure there is someone out there who might argue that the best way to develop a player is to start them on sandpaper or hard bat so they develop good footwork...

In any case, when someone is talking about blocking, one doesn't necessarily mean flat blocking.  The same is broadly true for topspin or kick blocking, it is easier to execute with a slightly stiffer blade.  Some related topics include the choice of rubber.  The main point is that taking strokes that are large (too much upper arm) to compensate for blade slowness is possible and so is gripping the racket too tightly to compensate for inadequate rebound.

I remember when someone on TTD argued that the reason why you use a slower blade is that you like to generate your own power.  Fan Zhendong is arguably the most powerful player on the world. Maybe Dima or Ionescu or Jorgic amongst Europeans.  None of those guys are using all wood blades now though and they are all some of the most powerful players in the world.  The flip side is that they also have some of the best touch or feeling in the world as well. 

The main benefit of using a slower and relatively less stiff blade is that contact and feeling errors are easier to detect given the vibration frequencies and the lower rebound when you hit the bal outside the sweet spot.  It is also easier to pl lay some touch and defensive shots because of this lack of rebound.  But if someone wants to learn modern table tennis, it is not entirely clear this is a good thing as there is a possibility that they hold the paddle too tightly to get power when they should be practicing different levels of grip pressure/stiffness to improve their touch.

Ultimately develop a player, including yourself, how you choose.  But there is no one size fits approach to this. But I definitely think with the new ball, the Korbel doesn't block like the kinds of offensive blades that a player will want to ultimately use and the faster tou can develop a player to use technique that those blades accommodate,  the better.  That said, there are many good players who use a Korbel. In the end, you just use what you want to use. 

The Szocs Sig 1 is slower than the FBPE. Strictly speaking. 

I honestly never heard of the term topspin/kick blocking. It's possible there's such thing as I need to educate myswlf more about it, bur it's also possible you are referring to is a counter top spin with a slight upwards motion either on forehand or backhand side. I think it is the most used type of stroke in modern table tennis when it comes backhand to backhand rallies. And besides that, as all topspin strokes, it is easier to.do.it with more flexible blade. Played with Korbel before and also with Korbel SK7 before that, and I had more room for error when doing counterloop backhand drills off the bounce, although I know it is always tricky to compare different blades

Regarding slower blades in relation to being able to generate your own power, I believe the flexibility is an important factor. Blades that are flexible give you big increase in speed when you hit hard enough, so they may be quite slow in general but still useful in today's game like in case of Korbel blade. We can all see Gionis hitting powerful winters from mid distance using his Korbel. Stiff, thicker blades, in contrast, can hoffer easier speed buildup, but the difference between 'normal' speed and speed from hitting hard is not so big, and a generally slower but more flexible blade can outperform the stiffer one when you go for that strong loop.

Jorgic play with that blade because he s sponsored. Mazunov ebenholz 7 and rosewood 7 is not slow. The sport is too marketed.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TwiddleDee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/20/2023 at 4:46pm
I transferred my 09c and Dignics 05 from my 89 gram Viscaria, to an all wood 86 gram Primorac, just to see how it played. Yes, it had more control and feeling, but it was certainly more difficult to get through a mid distance player who knows how to fish loops back, low and deep. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote p1ngp0ng3r Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/21/2023 at 1:18am
Personally I am a fan of 5 ply all-wood blades. Tried many and Infinity VPS is still my favorite. 

5 ply all-wood is still the best blade for starters or if you want to go back-to-basic. Especially as your gameplay is based on (top)spin. 7 Ply all-wood blades are thick and heavy (most of them are >90g) and combined with a larger head-size, they can become head-heavy. Owning several 7-ply blades, they all feel almost like bricks compared to a 5-ply blade. They are better for flat hits, but I do not agree that 7-ply is better for blocks. It might be the case, if your block is simply holding your bat in a certain angle and do nothing with it. But if you like to play a more "creative" block, a 5-ply blade is certainly capable of doing so. 

I never understand comments like "there is not a single pro player using a 5-ply blade". Certainly don't expect to see any of the worlds top 100 players with a 5-ply all-wood blade indeed, however, keep in mind that these players train 6-8 hours each day with a dedicated coach. Besides hard work, these players all have a talent or "feeling for the ball" and they are able to get the best out of their equipment. 

Everyone should play the equipment they want and I won't judge anyone for it. Having said that, I see too many amateur and mediocre players with carbon blades combined with fast rubbers and looking at their gameplay, they would definitely benefit a lot if they would use an all-wood blade with less powerful rubbers instead. 

To the OP: the Korbel is a great blade, especially if topspin is a major part of your game. The Japan version feels a bit harder compared to the regular European model. Head-size dimension is also slightly different , but you can check that on the UK BTY website. Reason for me not using the Korbel, is the handle which is too slim/narrow for my liking. 

Tip: if you like the layer construction and head-size of Korbel, but prefer a certain handle type/thickness, you could consider a custom blade. There are some great blade builders active on this and other forums. Will even be less expensive then a Korbel Japan. Personally I have very good experience with SDC (Sergio) which is also active on this forum.

No matter what equipment you use, the most important part is just to have fun playing TT :)

Edit: typos




Edited by p1ngp0ng3r - 11/21/2023 at 1:21am
Infinity VPS - Hybrid MK - T25 FX
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kolevtt View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kolevtt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/21/2023 at 3:07am
I have 60 years old blade with Korbel construction 6.0mm playing as the best old STIGA blades and better than any korbel. If you are interested you can send me message for details.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote doraemon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11/22/2023 at 7:35pm
I read all the comments after my last post.

Let me clarify a bit, I wrote those comments answering the question "what do you mean by stability with the new ball", therefore I described Korbel as being a bit flexy for easier blocking.

Now, I don't mean to say Korbel is a bad blade, I have previously used it for years.  It is a looping machine, but like I mentioned previously, in the 40+ plastic ball era, it is harder to block with Korbel, compared to a 7-ply allwood blade (like Clipper, for example).

Now, does it mean 7-ply allwood blade is better than Korbel?   Depends on your style of play.   It is easer for me to block using Clipper, but my loops are better with Korbel (given the same stroke).  Clipper is a good looping blade as well, but it is easier to loop with Korbel.   On the other hand, it is easier to block with Clipper.

So there are always two sides (positive and negative) of using a certain blade.  It all depends on your style of play.   I used to be an all out 2-wings looper, so I liked Korbel in the past.   Currently, I am more allround (as I am old now):  looping if necessary, but also push, block and smash.  So a stiffer blade is better for me now.

Edited by doraemon - 11/22/2023 at 7:36pm
Blade : Just wood
FH : black rubber
BH : red rubber
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