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Tips for correcting movements

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blahness View Drop Down
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    Posted: 02/10/2019 at 5:55pm
How do you incorporate new strokes into your game when you have limited practice time? I find myself regressing to old habits very often when I try to improve my strokes :( 

For e.g. the use of the nonplaying arm to "aim", whenever I use it my FH feels amazing, but then for some reason I slack and go back to my old habits with the nonplaying arm being fixed and hindering body rotation. There's other things like returning to ready position after serves, applying more force on BHs rather than playing a safe passive stroke which ends up less "safe" due to lack of spin, maintain an intense focus on the ball rather than chilling, not tensing up when hitting opportunity balls....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote serr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/10/2019 at 6:42pm
Focus on 1 bad habit at a certain amount of time. Don't try to fix everything at once, it creates a mess.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fatt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/10/2019 at 8:24pm
The questions are getting deep, that one is so intimate, tough, us and our inner game in touch when possible, on demand being the goal: welcome to table tennis shrinkery LOL. Just like a shrink is useful if you pay the money, paid table tennis lessons with a professional coach might help. If we lie down on a sofa and talk to a shrink who tells usadvice free of charge based on what we said, will the value of the session change, will we share the same and will the shrink's advice be as of quality as the one putting their reputation on the line? Paying a coach might be the detail that forces value into the training because you won't want to have wasted your investment and here, the money acts like a thin laquer protecting your outer layers. You will think about doing it right more often after paying and it will integrate better into your game, whatever learned with the coach will become faster a natural standard play. It's a tricky path but the worst case is you treat yourself with practicing with a high level player.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mjamja Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/10/2019 at 9:09pm
Originally posted by blahness blahness wrote:

How do you incorporate new strokes into your game when you have limited practice time? I find myself regressing to old habits very often when I try to improve my strokes :( 

You may need to quit playing matches for a while so you can retrain your muscle memory.  Closely monitoring video while you train is also important when you do not have a coach providing real-time feedback.  It is real pain to stop and check video every 5 min, but it may be the only way to make sure you are training what you want to do and not training the old habits.

I quit playing for 6 weeks and did shadow training and then robot training to change my countering.  It really changed the way I hit the ball.  So much so that now I have difficulty looping because in the heat of play I fall back into countering.

TTedge had a series of videos about re-learning the Fh loop.  I think it required 6 to 8 weeks before you were actually playing.  There was shadow stroking, dropping a ball and looping, looping slow (both speed and frequency) balls from robot at a fixed location, looping not quite playing speed balls at fixed location,  looping with footwork in fixed patterns, looping with random balls, and finally looping game speed random balls to Fh.  In each phase you videoed yourself and monitored the video often to see if you held form.  As you held form you monitored less frquently.  You had specific competincy goals to meet in each phase before you moved to the next phase.  It required a lot of patience on your part.

By the way I once laminted to Stellan Bengsston that I was hopeless because I just kept reverting to old habits.  He said I was not alone.  He told me that for years Persson would come visit with him and complain about how bad his Bh had gotten.  Everytime Stellan looked to help it seemed Persson had reverted to an old habit of dropping his hand way too low in the  backswing.  Persson had no idea that he had changed his stroke that much.  Once told, he (unlike us mortals) easily made adjustments and got back in form.  So do not feel too bad about reverting to bad habits.  It happens to the best unless someone is closely monitoring them.

Mark
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Slowhand Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/10/2019 at 10:27pm
Great answer from Mark. I find it almost impossible to override muscle memory under the stress of competition. Not only do I revert to bad habits I'm trying to correct in training, but the bad habits regain strength from being repeated in competition. Strongly recommend putting competition on hold while making significant changes in technique. Also agree that video monitoring is one of the best tools available. It's extremely helpful even if you have a good coach because you see yourself making the technical mistakes your coach is trying to correct. This saves a lot of time.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote blahness Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/13/2019 at 6:13pm
Thanks for all the replies, I think for me I might just get some multiballs and do some high quality practice with my practice partner...aside from lots of shadow practice!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mickd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/13/2019 at 7:30pm
Lots of great advice. I completely agree that taking a step back, going back to the basics and drilling them through multiball, then fixed drills, semi random drills, followed by random drills is the best.

That said, I feel like having matches while thinking about what you want to change helps a lot too. You don't want to overload yourself, so even during matches, consistently remind yourself about the one thing you're trying to change. Of course, ideally this wouldn't be in a competition that matters. But during league or everyday matches, it can really help you integrate it into your game.

I'm always surprised that with a little bit of active thought on a particular movement or technique or anything, I'm able to pull it off quite well during matches too. It's when I'm not reminding myself that I end up doing something half-arsed, resulting in low quality balls and misses.

Good luck!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote blahness Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/13/2019 at 9:24pm
Originally posted by mickd mickd wrote:

Lots of great advice. I completely agree that taking a step back, going back to the basics and drilling them through multiball, then fixed drills, semi random drills, followed by random drills is the best.

That said, I feel like having matches while thinking about what you want to change helps a lot too. You don't want to overload yourself, so even during matches, consistently remind yourself about the one thing you're trying to change. Of course, ideally this wouldn't be in a competition that matters. But during league or everyday matches, it can really help you integrate it into your game.

I'm always surprised that with a little bit of active thought on a particular movement or technique or anything, I'm able to pull it off quite well during matches too. It's when I'm not reminding myself that I end up doing something half-arsed, resulting in low quality balls and misses.

Good luck!!


Yes we kinda share some of the same faults of "taking it easy", and doing half arsed balls For me it's usually my BH because I have a bad habit of just trying to bring the ball across to the other side of the table rather than making an aggressive stroke (which counterintuitively is much safer due to the extra spin). It's also because during practice I help to block a lot on the BH, maybe a bit too much that I forget the timing of the BH attacking topspin.
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