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Knee brace recommendation?

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Baal View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Baal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/01/2015 at 12:46pm
Here is a review in British Medical Journal

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1122566/

I posted a bunch more like it further up thread.

Like I said there are things about these kinds of injuries that are well known to specialists and almost nobody else.
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AgentHEX View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AgentHEX Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/01/2015 at 12:54pm
Yes I read that. However it says nothing to establish it doesn't work in general, only that it doesn't work for that pathology.

Icing is prevalent in sports at all levels, even pros. Again, perhaps not exactly to sooth the "tendonpathy" or whatever terminology they wish to use, but it's clearly doing something for some folks.

Eg. if symptoms of pain occur simultaneously with, say, A & B, and icing for a few min  help A, what exactly is the risk?

---
edit: To clarify the argument, the medical report claims that tendonitis isn't caused by inflammation per se. However, it's pretty clear that tendon damage can be concurrent with inflammation, esp. due to the strains of sports. Nobody is arguing that icing it down somehow cures tendonitis, but it can certain alleviate what is a serious symptom of pain and whatever other side-effects of inflammation.


Edited by AgentHEX - 02/01/2015 at 2:10pm
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Rich215 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rich215 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/01/2015 at 1:09pm
I have a bad knee from years of abuse in a few board sports.  I messed up my MCL a few times and never had surgery luckily.  But I mainly need compression on the socket to help.  I have used several sleeve types adjustable and non.   I dont kneed the stabilizer bars on the side. 

I have found this ACE one to be really nice, my fav so far. (and inexpensive as well)  It has top and bottom adjusters and the best part is that it has a nice lycra sleeve section on the back of the leg.  No more itching or rashes like from most of the other types that are non neoprene/lycra type contact areas. 

ACE Moderate Knee Support. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote wturber Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/01/2015 at 9:52pm
Originally posted by Baal Baal wrote:



Ice is a bit tricky.  Helps if your problem is inflammatory, otherwise not.  Does not facilitate repair.  Causes very acute reduction in inflammation by reducing blood flow to the area.  These issues are complex and not everybody has the same type of problem.


You may be oversimplifying things.  Ice is a vasoconstrictor and increased vascularity is found in tendonosis.  Further, ice is an analgesic.  So Ice may be useful after all. It isn't clear from what I'm reading.

http://www.elitesportstherapy.com/tendinosis-vs--tendonitis

Also, it seems that the simple  notion that tendonitis/tendonosis is not an inflammatory condition in any significant sense is currently under some criticism.

http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2013/03/08/bjsports-2012-091957.full

Given that a person's knee pain may not have anything to do with tendonitis/tendonosis, and may very well have a significant inflammatory component (I suspect that the root cause of a LOT of mild knee problems is simply not known by the person with the bad knee) it seems to me that if ice makes the knee feel better that it is a pretty reasonable and conservative bit of treatment.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Baal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/01/2015 at 10:59pm
Yes, it was a bit over-simplified.  In addition, there is not just one form of inflammation.  I still think the advice to use ice, which has been for a long time more or less automatically assumed as if there is no potential for a negative impact, has to be questioned.  As I said, the issues are complex.  There is an even more nuanced view here.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23274757

One thing to keep in mind is that the increased neovascularization in some tendonopathies is thought to be associated with pain not because of the changed blood flow, but as a result of the neurons that sprout along those new vessels.  And there are even data that show that applying vasodilators in the vicinity of a sick Achilles tendon reduces pain as a result of increasing blood flow to the area. 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18447938

Add in the fact that the pain may have little relationship to the amount of tendon damage present (pain-free tendons can be catostrophically degenerated, and tendons can be very painful with miminimal evidence of damage) and things get even more hard to understand.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Red24601 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/03/2015 at 10:58am
Thanks for all the recommendations. I started with the cheapo recommendations first --- I bought the thin knee straps and played several matches (I also did more stretching than usual before starting play). Either through placebo or actual effectiveness, I felt more lively on my legs. When I got home, I did the "ICE" combination by strapping ice packs to my knees using my compression knee braces and then elevating my legs for about 15-20 minutes. The knees felt much better than usual the next day, and I'm going to let them rest as well. I'll try the same regimen this coming weekend and see if I get similar results.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AgentHEX Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/03/2015 at 7:47pm
Originally posted by wturber wturber wrote:


1) I use Actipatch devices that employ low level PEMF to theoretically reduce inflammation and perhaps speed healing.  And while my use of these has been coincident with one of the best periods of good knee behavior and almost no need to use wraps it is hard to give the devices credit since I've also been doing the hill climbs.




Have you look into how this works any further? I pulled up their website and it's a low 27mhz signal pulsed at 1khz, which seems long in wavelength, and whatever medical studies they referenced didn't seem very technical. Kind of makes me wonder if there are specifies to the EM field created (esp since they have devices with very different antenna) or they're just spitballing it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Baal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/03/2015 at 8:05pm
Unfortunately, evidence from controlled clinical trials  in refereed journals does not provide strong evidence that Actipatch and related devices actually work. 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23973142

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16776826

On the other hand, there is this.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22504115

Time will tell, but I am pretty skeptical.  The one thing for sure is that nobody is reporting any adverse effects either.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote weestenosis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02/04/2015 at 8:04pm
I think what u need is more on conditioning of you knee structures and muscles in order to protect you from fall or any injusry/instability. Partial squat will do..then later on deep squat...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AlexCrowlen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/09/2021 at 5:45am
Brace is a good tool for fixing the knee. In my case, after surgery, I wore a brace for two years. The doctor advised me a lot of stores to buy this thing, my choice stopped at dunbarmedical.com . I have no regrets about the purchase. Bandage helps me in everyday life: jumping, running, and just to walk comfortably. But I would also advise you to massage the knee. After a day's work, you take the brace off and massage the knee well to relax the muscles.you can use different essential oils with vitamins.

Edited by AlexCrowlen - Yesterday at 4:38pm
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