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USATT CEO Gordon Kaye resignation

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote ndotson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/09/2019 at 3:04pm
I could see TTX being a potential solution if ping pong were a totally obscure game that needed to be introduced to an unfamiliar audience...but it's not. Gordy even said, "...people are playing "ping pong" an awful lot, whether it's at home, in a rec center, a club, or somewhere else."

If the barrier to playing table tennis were that the rules are too difficult or boring to a casual player, then something similar to TTX would have already naturally emerged from the basements and garages...but it hasn't. If the USATT's goal is to increase consumers of their core product (membership), then TTX would be a step sideways.

My two-cent suggestion is that the USATT focus on pouring resources into the development of smaller, grassroots clubs in the US. As an owner of a small club, I can attest to how difficult it is start, operate, and maintain a club across time. Perhaps the USATT can help provide support and solutions to some of the challenges for small clubs, the most common being adequate playing space. Can the USATT work with municipalities to help make more public space available? Using/renting public school facilities is nearly impossible anymore and logistically unfeasible. Club owners are forced into situations where costs are high and the ability to attract casual players becomes very difficult.

If there were many more, decent quality, inexpensive places/clubs to play, then more casual players would find their way in and experience the benefits of playing...social, health, fun. That's where a demand for USATT's core product is created.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote skip3119 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/09/2019 at 3:45pm
USATT is not the origin of TTX
ITTF is.

ITTF's strategic plan is to promote TTX and they reckon that many TTX players will try TT.
Thus, increase the Table Tennis players' population.


Edited by skip3119 - 01/09/2019 at 9:10pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 1dennistt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/10/2019 at 10:13am
I think part of the "Plan" is to increase the number of players who count as active table tennis players, whether they play TTX or traditional TT won't be the point.  Increasing the number of players who can be counted as "active" looks better.  Their "Hope" is to bring some of those players to traditional table tennis.  Ermm

Personally if that is the goal, I think the TTX rules should have been used with hardbats or sandpaper, not what they have chosen, but that is just me.  LOL

And 20 years from now when TTX tournaments award prizes like Tennis tournaments, I'll be proven wrong.  Meanwhile TT in the US will have little to no change, being bypasses from the new shinny thing that wasn't meant to but replaced it anyway.Wink

I'm not sure what the draw is going to be to kick this off, what is the hook to get the ball rolling so to speak.  I'm watching to find out how this is going to get started and play out.  I can see this working really well in places not currently served by TT now, or places where less serious TT would be easier to organize.  I'm thinking schools, where TTX would definitely be easier to work with for them.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lineup32 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/10/2019 at 11:13am
Originally posted by ndotson ndotson wrote:

I could see TTX being a potential solution if ping pong were a totally obscure game that needed to be introduced to an unfamiliar audience...but it's not. Gordy even said, "...people are playing "ping pong" an awful lot, whether it's at home, in a rec center, a club, or somewhere else."

If the barrier to playing table tennis were that the rules are too difficult or boring to a casual player, then something similar to TTX would have already naturally emerged from the basements and garages...but it hasn't. If the USATT's goal is to increase consumers of their core product (membership), then TTX would be a step sideways.

My two-cent suggestion is that the USATT focus on pouring resources into the development of smaller, grassroots clubs in the US. As an owner of a small club, I can attest to how difficult it is start, operate, and maintain a club across time. Perhaps the USATT can help provide support and solutions to some of the challenges for small clubs, the most common being adequate playing space. Can the USATT work with municipalities to help make more public space available? Using/renting public school facilities is nearly impossible anymore and logistically unfeasible. Club owners are forced into situations where costs are high and the ability to attract casual players becomes very difficult.

If there were many more, decent quality, inexpensive places/clubs to play, then more casual players would find their way in and experience the benefits of playing...social, health, fun. That's where a demand for USATT's core product is created.


Excellent points !

USATT operates on the belief that a white kid from a fly over state will one day win a medal for TT in the Olympics generating mass interest for TT in white enclaves throughout America.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fatt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/10/2019 at 11:36am
I somehow think the TTX idea might fail because the incredible difference in material and spin. Most skills developed in TTX will not apply in the "real" game, I put "real" in between quotes because history shows that what's real is what works and the possibility that TTX will be the new normal is not zero.

Wouldn't it be preferable that TTX feature regular inverted rubbers, we would just have to choose them slow and not too spinny.

If we see blades like this available at under $10, I bet it is possible to mass market something decent under that price. Pricewise it would be the same while re. equipment,  it would not present as drastic a difference as what TTX proposes now. 

It is important to make TTX a dumbed down game with MUCH less speed and MUCH less spin but in direct relation to what we are doing now, but that is true only if the real goal is to develop what we have now.

This is the key point: is TTX an endeavor to support our actual spin game or just a way to create a new market and a new discipline? if the latter, we get another pickleball like project on the rise I do not care much about; if the former, we need material that is closer to what most people use now: inverted on both sides. Then, like now, people will get slowly exposed to other stuff (LP, SP, Anti etc...).

One of the challenge in finding those inverted rubbers for TTX is to make sure they are not collecting dust and become an anti rubber in a month. Cheap 729 $3 rubbers won't cut it: sticky and heavy, no thanks. For example, if I can buy those Neottec Hinomi rubbers at under $10 with the 30% discount, it means I can probably get them at $3 a piece if I buy a 20 feet container of them.

It is probably too late to defend the idea above but i thought it was worth to mention that TTX is not really supporting table tennis as WE, the table tennis players, know it: TTX is surfing a wave generated by the lack of traction TT shows; pretending that TTX is supporting TT to me sounds like a vice president supporting the president by starting his own personal program: if it works great, he will get rid of the president, if it does not, it was a waste.

-----
PS: I am not affiliated with Neottec, I just like their products and pricing, they are the true Euro equivalent of what Cole sells. Jolan, who manages a tt shop in France, told me their inexpensive carbon blade is really, really good for example. I think they are a very underrated company.



Edited by fatt - 01/10/2019 at 11:44am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Slowhand Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/10/2019 at 12:07pm
Originally posted by lineup32 lineup32 wrote:

Originally posted by ndotson ndotson wrote:

I could see TTX being a potential solution if ping pong were a totally obscure game that needed to be introduced to an unfamiliar audience...but it's not. Gordy even said, "...people are playing "ping pong" an awful lot, whether it's at home, in a rec center, a club, or somewhere else."

If the barrier to playing table tennis were that the rules are too difficult or boring to a casual player, then something similar to TTX would have already naturally emerged from the basements and garages...but it hasn't. If the USATT's goal is to increase consumers of their core product (membership), then TTX would be a step sideways.

My two-cent suggestion is that the USATT focus on pouring resources into the development of smaller, grassroots clubs in the US. As an owner of a small club, I can attest to how difficult it is start, operate, and maintain a club across time. Perhaps the USATT can help provide support and solutions to some of the challenges for small clubs, the most common being adequate playing space. Can the USATT work with municipalities to help make more public space available? Using/renting public school facilities is nearly impossible anymore and logistically unfeasible. Club owners are forced into situations where costs are high and the ability to attract casual players becomes very difficult.

If there were many more, decent quality, inexpensive places/clubs to play, then more casual players would find their way in and experience the benefits of playing...social, health, fun. That's where a demand for USATT's core product is created.


Excellent points !

USATT operates on the belief that a white kid from a fly over state will one day win a medal for TT in the Olympics generating mass interest for TT in white enclaves throughout America.

Strongly agree. TT is already popular in the USA. It's just that most people think of it as a game and not a competitive sport. I think the best way by far to change this is to get it into the schools. The USATT should focus on creating interscholastic leagues, first in the cities where tt is most popular so schools wouldn't have trouble finding coaches. The capital investment necessary to start and sustain a tt team is tiny compared to most other sports. I'm sure if there were the prospect of public school leagues in San Fran, LA, NY, etc., tt companies and potential deep pocket sponsors like Google would consider getting involved. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mts388 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/10/2019 at 6:27pm
One of the problems I've seen with TT in schools is that the equipment doesn't last long. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote patrickhrdlicka Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 12:54am
Originally posted by ndotson ndotson wrote:

I could see TTX being a potential solution if ping pong were a totally obscure game that needed to be introduced to an unfamiliar audience...but it's not. Gordy even said, "...people are playing "ping pong" an awful lot, whether it's at home, in a rec center, a club, or somewhere else."

If the barrier to playing table tennis were that the rules are too difficult or boring to a casual player, then something similar to TTX would have already naturally emerged from the basements and garages...but it hasn't. If the USATT's goal is to increase consumers of their core product (membership), then TTX would be a step sideways.

My two-cent suggestion is that the USATT focus on pouring resources into the development of smaller, grassroots clubs in the US. As an owner of a small club, I can attest to how difficult it is start, operate, and maintain a club across time. Perhaps the USATT can help provide support and solutions to some of the challenges for small clubs, the most common being adequate playing space. Can the USATT work with municipalities to help make more public space available? Using/renting public school facilities is nearly impossible anymore and logistically unfeasible. Club owners are forced into situations where costs are high and the ability to attract casual players becomes very difficult.

If there were many more, decent quality, inexpensive places/clubs to play, then more casual players would find their way in and experience the benefits of playing...social, health, fun. That's where a demand for USATT's core product is created.

Not surprisingly, I agree 100% with Nick and have been advocating similar points. In addition, TT needs to move into schools (i.e., we need to provide infrastructure support and know-how (ambassador program by volunteers)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gordy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 1:32am
I hope you guys don't mind, but I am just reading/listening. 

As someone said earlier, TTX is not a USATT initiative...it is solely being promoted by the ITTF right now.

One more quick note for you all to think about...While I agree 1000% that the schools are the key, according to Wikipedia there are over 14,000 school districts in the USA. I also agree with Patrick that the key to a school program is creating a solid and committed volunteer base (like what has been done in New York with Ben Nisbet or Milwaukee with Linda Leaf). Just some food for thought.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gordy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 1:36am
Sorry, one more thought...Nick earlier said:

"If there were many more, decent quality, inexpensive places/clubs to play, then more casual players would find their way in and experience the benefits of playing...social, health, fun. That's where a demand for USATT's core product is created."

Can I suggest that maybe we add the word "accessible"? Seems to me a big challenge we have in the USA is the lack of full-time, centrally located clubs that are easy to find and accessible on a regular basis.  It seems to me for the most part the areas where we are seeing significant growth are generally the regions where full-time clubs play a big role in that growth. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mts388 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 1:45am

Although golfers will pay $50 for a round of golf, table players complain if they are charged more than $10 for 4 or 5 hours of table tennis.  What is strange is that table tennis players are usually high income people.

I can't think of an activity that is as cheap to play as table tennis.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BH-Man Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 2:39am
In Sacramento, the two full time clubs that look to be going away charged 5-60 USD a month for everyday play... any many people avoid that and show up to play for free at church once a week, then pay 5-10 USD 4x-5x a week to bar-hop to a different school/municipal gym for TT at an overall higher monthly expense.

A decent pro level golf club would cost a boatload of money,, and many very willing to buy many of these golf equipment at that cost, but will keep their rubbers a year before replacing haha. 

TT seems to be a scrooge magnet.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kenneyy88 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 2:49am
Originally posted by mts388 mts388 wrote:


Although golfers will pay $50 for a round of golf, table players complain if they are charged more than $10 for 4 or 5 hours of table tennis.  What is strange is that table tennis players are usually high income people.

I can't think of an activity that is as cheap to play as table tennis.

Basketball, soccer, handball, running, Ultimate Frisbee, Football, Tennis if on free courts, Drawing, If you've already have a computer- computer games, swimming, Catch. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kenneyy88 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 2:51am
Originally posted by Gordy Gordy wrote:

Sorry, one more thought...Nick earlier said:

"If there were many more, decent quality, inexpensive places/clubs to play, then more casual players would find their way in and experience the benefits of playing...social, health, fun. That's where a demand for USATT's core product is created."

Can I suggest that maybe we add the word "accessible"? Seems to me a big challenge we have in the USA is the lack of full-time, centrally located clubs that are easy to find and accessible on a regular basis.  It seems to me for the most part the areas where we are seeing significant growth are generally the regions where full-time clubs play a big role in that growth. 

If a club is successful, its usually overcrowded and will not accommodate any new players, and also frustrating for committed players. 


Edited by kenneyy88 - 01/11/2019 at 2:51am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote benfb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 3:02am
Originally posted by mts388 mts388 wrote:


Although golfers will pay $50 for a round of golf, table players complain if they are charged more than $10 for 4 or 5 hours of table tennis.  What is strange is that table tennis players are usually high income people.
This observation has been made by many people, all with the same conclusion.  I did the same once upon a time myself.  But the conclusion is wrong. More precisely, it's backwards.

Instead of concluding that table tennis players are cheap, the epiphany here is that table tennis can be played cheaply, in a way that few other sports can match.  This is important because it means that people don't need clubs or tournaments or organizations to enjoy table tennis.  As a result table tennis will always struggle to convert the public from casual ping pongers to table tennis sportsmen.

Even by this analysis, America is a special case.  In most of the world, people need public venues to play.  At these public venues casual players are exposed to serious players and advanced techniques of play.  This provides that needed link from casual players to serious sport.  However, this doesn't work in America.  We have a much higher rated of home ownership than the rest of the world, and our homes are much larger.  So here, compared to everywhere else, we don't need public venues to play table tennis.  Who needs a club when you can just put a table up in your garage or basement?

My opinion is that we need a greater grassroots effort to overcome these handicaps.  The most obvious solution is promotion in the schools.  Unfortunately, most people don't realize that schools aren't leaders of social change; schools are reactionary.  Teachers teach what they were taught.  Because American schools don't have a history with table tennis, you will find that most schools are disinterested in the sport.  Not opposed to it -- even willing to cooperate with volunteers as long as it doesn't cost anything -- just lacking enthusiasm.  The people promoting soccer in America realized this 50 years ago, which is why schools weren't the center of the early grassroots soccer movement.  That was done with youth organizations outside of the schools, and the schools caught on later.

The second alternative is to expand the efforts of local clubs.  This has potential because the local organizers are an extraordinarily enthusiastic crowd.  With the right kind of backing, local clubs might develop the types of outreach programs that would engage the recreational public.  Local clubs are probably our best shot at making table tennis popular here.

Unfortunately, I believe the trend at USATT has been away from support for local clubs and grassroots efforts.  This reflects the funding coming from USOC and their focus on trying to produce Olympic caliber players without first laying the foundation of a popular sport in this country.  Until USATT recognizes this effort, I expect our sport to continue just drifting along with no great success.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tassie52 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 6:56am
Oh. my. lord.  What a complete and utter waste of time.  Yet again a topic has decomposed into another "how do we make table tennis great in the USA" bore-fest. 

A few basic points:
1.  The USA is not the centre of the universe (despite believing its own PR campaign).  If table tennis in the USA dies a slow and unpleasant death, the rest of the world will barely notice let alone mourn its passing. 
2.  For its part, the ITTF would like table tennis to succeed in north America for one reason only: $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
3.  Under normal circumstances, the ITTF is the enemy.  I've been following tt forums for a number of years now and the venom spewed at the ITTF has been quite extraordinary.  But... as soon as someone from the USA is given a job with them, it's all "Congratulations!"
4.  If anyone - Gordon included - thinks they're going to make one damn bit of difference to the trajectory of table tennis across the world, they're completely bonkers.  Sport in our time is governed by one thing only:  $$$$$$$$$$$$$   Without it, nothing changes. 
5.  The level of funding that table tennis has at the moment is so insignificant as to be embarrassing.   Tennis is being played in Australia at the moment - Brisbane, Sydney and Hobart all hosting tournaments with prize money which makes table tennis look sick.  For example, the smallest of these is the Hobart International with USD250,000.  Then the Australian open will cough up $62,500,000!!!  That's the month of January alone.  Multiply that by 12 and then ponder the reality that is table tennis.

Yes, I'm being deliberately provocative.  Not because I'm a troll, but because just once I'd like us to get real and stop pretending that what we do is important.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote danseemiller Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 7:06am
Sport in our time is governed by one thing only:  $$$$$$$$$$$$$   Without it, nothing changes.  

Absolutely right.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Slowhand Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 10:29am
Originally posted by danseemiller danseemiller wrote:

Sport in our time is governed by one thing only:  $$$$$$$$$$$$$   Without it, nothing changes.  

Absolutely right.
Exactly. Which is why USATT should focus on places where a little money can go a long way. Leverage is the key along with patience. In other words, schools. No need to worry about all 14000 districts in the USA. Start with a half dozen big ones. If we had a few interscholastic leagues in California, NY, Texas, Maryland, etc., sponsors and money would find them. It wouldn't be much at first, but they wouldn't need much. And it would grow from there as the almost universally cash-strapped districts in the country realized the advantages of a cheap, popular interscholastic co-ed sport.

It might be more glamorous for USATT to focus on the Olympics and pro tournaments, but it's a waste of time to build top down rather than bottom up. First we need to multiply the population of serious players. Only then will we get the $$$$$$$.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pongfugrasshopper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 10:38am
Originally posted by Slowhand Slowhand wrote:

Originally posted by danseemiller danseemiller wrote:

Sport in our time is governed by one thing only:  $$$$$$$$$$$$$   Without it, nothing changes.  

Absolutely right.
Exactly. Which is why USATT should focus on places where a little money can go a long way. Leverage is the key along with patience. In other words, schools. No need to worry about all 14000 districts in the USA. Start with a half dozen big ones. If we had a few interscholastic leagues in California, NY, Texas, Maryland, etc., sponsors and money would find them. It wouldn't be much at first, but they wouldn't need much. And it would grow from there as the almost universally cash-strapped districts in the country realized the advantages of a cheap, popular interscholastic co-ed sport.

It might be more glamorous for USATT to focus on the Olympics and pro tournaments, but it's a waste of time to build top down rather than bottom up. First we need to multiply the population of serious players. Only then will we get the $$$$$$$.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 1dennistt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 11:08am
Not to beat a dead horse, but schools here already have established sports, with people entrenched in the system.  More importantly the schools are happy with the sports they have and those sports are popular with both kids and parents (and in some cases alumni), not to mention coaches that are already in the system.  This is another case of follow the money in many cases.

For all that I agree with the arguments against the Top Down approach, it does make it easier to point to something for school kids to aspire to.  We currently have a new crop of players who fill this role quite well, and I'm sure some people are making kids in their programs aware of them.  I think it's easier if you have someone for them to aspire to, the carrot so to speak, to motivate and inspire them.

Sports you have to compete against include, but are not limited to these:  Football, Soccer, Basketball, Baseball, Hockey, Volleyball, Swimming, Diving, Track and Field, and in some schools Field Hockey, Rugby, it gets to be a long list.  The point being these are already established, and entrenched, and are what we have to overcome to wiggle in to the school system.  It is not an easy task, but not an impossible one either.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pgpg Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 11:36am
Originally posted by 1dennistt 1dennistt wrote:

Not to beat a dead horse, but schools here already have established sports, with people entrenched in the system.  More importantly the schools are happy with the sports they have and those sports are popular with both kids and parents (and in some cases alumni), not to mention coaches that are already in the system.  This is another case of follow the money in many cases.

For all that I agree with the arguments against the Top Down approach, it does make it easier to point to something for school kids to aspire to.  We currently have a new crop of players who fill this role quite well, and I'm sure some people are making kids in their programs aware of them.  I think it's easier if you have someone for them to aspire to, the carrot so to speak, to motivate and inspire them.

Sports you have to compete against include, but are not limited to these:  Football, Soccer, Basketball, Baseball, Hockey, Volleyball, Swimming, Diving, Track and Field, and in some schools Field Hockey, Rugby, it gets to be a long list.  The point being these are already established, and entrenched, and are what we have to overcome to wiggle in to the school system.  It is not an easy task, but not an impossible one either.

That's where parents come in (may be): school districts with large immigrant population might be more receptive to introduction of TT. I'm not an expert in school-parent dynamics though.  

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JimT Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 1:35pm
Originally posted by mts388 mts388 wrote:


Although golfers will pay $50 for a round of golf, table players complain if they are charged more than $10 for 4 or 5 hours of table tennis.  What is strange is that table tennis players are usually high income people.

I can't think of an activity that is as cheap to play as table tennis.


Possibly because golfers get much more for those $50 - like showers, room to sit and relax, a lot of room to play (how do we really compare golf courses and small gym?) etc.

And then there is a simple market rule - you can charge as much as the people are willing to pay. In Metro Boston area, TT club in Waltham charged (and probably is still charging) $15 for a walk-in / day play. Facility is better than club in Medford ($9), professional floor, more room to play - at least it is used to be like that, I have not visited it in two years. And yet 4-5 years after they opened virtually nobody is coming there to play - except for the kids who sign up for coaching and their (quite high) coaching fees of course include the play fee.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fatt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 2:01pm
One day, I calculated that the city of Seattle, where it rains 9 months per year, has about $150,000,000 worth of prime real estate allocated to tennis courts where people can play free of charge. That's a lot of money for a sport that is played that little. 

TT can hardly compete when the only places to play are full time clubs that costs $700+ a year or community centers opened twice a week and where we also have to pay a fee. That favor to tennis is insane and should be open to a civil class action lawsuit.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gordy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 2:41pm
I am curious - does anyone here work for a school district or done any programming with one? 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dual700 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 3:50pm
Originally posted by Gordy Gordy wrote:

I am curious - does anyone here work for a school district or done any programming with one? 
What do you need to know sir?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gordy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 4:09pm
Thanks Dual...just wondering if you could discuss, on here or in a PM, the challenges and "politics" of working with school districts, the structure, etc. I have had some experience but would like to hear others thoughts and experiences as well...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dual700 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 4:18pm
Originally posted by Gordy Gordy wrote:

Thanks Dual...just wondering if you could discuss, on here or in a PM, the challenges and "politics" of working with school districts, the structure, etc. I have had some experience but would like to hear others thoughts and experiences as well...
Challenges?
Politics?
Nepotism?
Bureaucracy?
Corruption?

No way!!! LOLLOL

Anything sir.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Purett Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 5:39pm
Originally posted by Gordy Gordy wrote:

I am curious - does anyone here work for a school district or done any programming with one? 
you could ask Ben Nisbet or Sydney Christofer they did it in New York City
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote patrickhrdlicka Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 5:53pm
I will describe my situation for some perspective. 

Our club is associated with a university and thus only available to students and employees. We enjoy free and frequent access (4x per week) to a venue that holds up to 8 tables if we squeeze together - for us it is great. 

I have tried contacting parks and rec in our little town (pop: 25k) to inquire about access to a gym. Infrequent and expensive ($50/h) access to a venue holding a very limited number (~2-3) of tables (storage problems) that we would have to purchase. Same with other local government buildings. 

There are a handful of schools. The ones that I am familiar with (and have a vested interest in) have limited or no space for setting-up and - especially - storing the tables.    

Admittedly, I have not contacted the other schools and there might be opportunities, but I just have a hard time seeing the space/price ratio become truly feasible. In Denmark, school gyms were more abundant it seems and available for free or very cheap. 
Feedback: http://mytabletennis.net/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=69419&title=feedback-patrickhrdlicka

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote geardaddy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/11/2019 at 6:04pm
Originally posted by Gordy Gordy wrote:

I am curious - does anyone here work for a school district or done any programming with one? 

I would suggest Mitch Seidenfeld as a resource (http://www.tabletennismn.com).  He is responsible for creating a High School state championship event for a number of years, and for High Schools to establish TT as a club-level activity.

Also, Mitch is a long time coach that has been very instrumental in training junior players in our region, many of which have become some of the best players in our state.
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