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aerial View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote aerial Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/04/2019 at 5:37pm
Originally posted by bappcbrad bappcbrad wrote:

My favorite player was Virgil Miller. He played in the South Bend/Elkhart Indiana area. Virgil was one of the main financial
contributors to the South Bend Club and the St. Joe Valley Open.
For many years we gave out the Virgil Miller award to the person who
best supported the areas Table Tennis community. Virgil was the greatest sportsman in our sport I have ever been around. (in 40 years) He was a 1800-1900 rated player who always helped everyone to improve. If you ever beat Virgil, which was not easy, he genially was happy for your success.
I use him as THE example and inspiration of true sportsmanship, that we always instilled in the Juniors in South Bend and now in Broken Arrow OK. One year he rambled into the Elkhart Club a bit disheveled with his hair a bit unruly and was ready to play his matches in the Table Tennis event. I asked him why is your hair out of place Virgil? He said he had just finished another event. I asked what event? He said the 100 yard dash. How'd you do, I said? Oh I won no problem, I'm still pretty fast for an old Amish businessman. Virgil was the best. He is missed.

what a wholesome story compared to the usual tt elitist who will only play someone in their league
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ggreco Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/04/2019 at 5:43pm
Mikael Appelgren and Michael Maze for their sensibility on topspin and topspin lobs and for their capacity to keep the ball in the game.
Vladimir Samsonov for the placement skill
Mima Ito for her speedness and the high rhythm
Hou Yingchao, Wang Xi, Ruwen Filus and Chen Weixing for their versatilite and amazing style of play.
Jan Ove Waldner and Alexander Karakasevic for their immense touch and talent.
Werner Schlager, Steffen Fetzner, Kalinikos Kreanga for their powerful backhand topspin.


Edited by ggreco - 06/05/2019 at 2:15am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bard romance Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/04/2019 at 8:26pm
Originally posted by aerial aerial wrote:

Originally posted by bappcbrad bappcbrad wrote:

My favorite player was Virgil Miller. He played in the South Bend/Elkhart Indiana area. Virgil was one of the main financial
contributors to the South Bend Club and the St. Joe Valley Open.
For many years we gave out the Virgil Miller award to the person who
best supported the areas Table Tennis community. Virgil was the greatest sportsman in our sport I have ever been around. (in 40 years) He was a 1800-1900 rated player who always helped everyone to improve. If you ever beat Virgil, which was not easy, he genially was happy for your success.
I use him as THE example and inspiration of true sportsmanship, that we always instilled in the Juniors in South Bend and now in Broken Arrow OK. One year he rambled into the Elkhart Club a bit disheveled with his hair a bit unruly and was ready to play his matches in the Table Tennis event. I asked him why is your hair out of place Virgil? He said he had just finished another event. I asked what event? He said the 100 yard dash. How'd you do, I said? Oh I won no problem, I'm still pretty fast for an old Amish businessman. Virgil was the best. He is missed.

what a wholesome story compared to the usual tt elitist who will only play someone in their league


I see comments like these and would ask if it makes you an elitist to walk past a homeless person asking for change?

Sure, it is nice to share your time with someone who may not bring much of a challenge or excitement to the table. I do it sometimes. But oftentimes these rejections that are perceived to be due to skill level differences are more due to the fact that it's just one stranger to another - I highly doubt any friend would turn down another friend consistently for a quick hit. As a stranger, you aren't owed anybody's time just because you play at the same club.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote DonnOlsen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/04/2019 at 9:10pm
I could go on forever on this, so blessed we have been with such greatness.

As in the context of: What's not to love . . .To mention a few.

  • What's not to love about the stupendous breakthrough of sky-flying Rye Seung-min?
  • What's not to love about the earth-shaking Hyun Jung-hwa?
  • What's not to love about the world's-greatest-women-athlete-of-her-time Zhang Yining surpassing the unsurpassable Wang Nan?
  • What's not to love about the Year 2000 Swedish Men's Table Tennis Team at the World's?
  • What's not to love about the Year 1979 Hungarian Men's Table Tennis Team at the World's?
Just to mention a few.

On a special note for the USA: During the long dominance of Chinese-developed players winning the U.S. Men's Nationals, only one player was able to break this power structure.  It was Eric Owens.  Eric is my choice for the most accomplished person, from childhood through to today, that American table tennis has ever been blessed with.

Thanks,


Edited by DonnOlsen - 06/04/2019 at 9:44pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kakapo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/05/2019 at 12:49am
JSH, Matsushita, Shiono  Waldner, He Zhi Wen for thé entertainment , Saive for for thé fighting spirit

Edited by kakapo - 06/05/2019 at 12:49am
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aerial View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote aerial Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/05/2019 at 8:21am
Originally posted by bard romance bard romance wrote:


I see comments like these and would ask if it makes you an elitist to walk past a homeless person asking for change?

Sure, it is nice to share your time with someone who may not bring much of a challenge or excitement to the table. I do it sometimes. But oftentimes these rejections that are perceived to be due to skill level differences are more due to the fact that it's just one stranger to another - I highly doubt any friend would turn down another friend consistently for a quick hit. As a stranger, you aren't owed anybody's time just because you play at the same club.

I'd argue comparing a low level club player to a homeless person is pretty elitist, and pretty farfetched from who actually makes a club money.

the club I go to, the owner admits that the majority of his profits are from low level players wanting to improve while the high level players didn't give him the same amount of returns and additionally he'd say most of the high level players are spoiled/entitled.

also to answer your question, I would say walking past a homeless person does not make you elitist, but treating a low level player at a club as a homeless person definitely does. the tt world is quite small, unless you go to Europe or Asia, each club I've been to in the U.S., it's the same cast (or almost) the same cast of characters, so I also wouldn't equate a club-mate to a total stranger


Edited by aerial - 06/05/2019 at 8:22am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bard romance Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/05/2019 at 9:17am
Originally posted by aerial aerial wrote:

Originally posted by bard romance bard romance wrote:


I see comments like these and would ask if it makes you an elitist to walk past a homeless person asking for change?

Sure, it is nice to share your time with someone who may not bring much of a challenge or excitement to the table. I do it sometimes. But oftentimes these rejections that are perceived to be due to skill level differences are more due to the fact that it's just one stranger to another - I highly doubt any friend would turn down another friend consistently for a quick hit. As a stranger, you aren't owed anybody's time just because you play at the same club.

I'd argue comparing a low level club player to a homeless person is pretty elitist, and pretty farfetched from who actually makes a club money.

the club I go to, the owner admits that the majority of his profits are from low level players wanting to improve while the high level players didn't give him the same amount of returns and additionally he'd say most of the high level players are spoiled/entitled.

also to answer your question, I would say walking past a homeless person does not make you elitist, but treating a low level player at a club as a homeless person definitely does. the tt world is quite small, unless you go to Europe or Asia, each club I've been to in the U.S., it's the same cast (or almost) the same cast of characters, so I also wouldn't equate a club-mate to a total stranger


Well lets not go in circles here but I think your implication that a homeless person's life is incomparable to anyone else's. To me all lives are the same. The point I was making here is that there are plenty of interactions in our daily lives in which we feel that someone else is not owed our resources (time or money).

A club owner's perspective will naturally be different than that of its members - they are their to play table tennis, it is not necessarily their job to be ambassadors of the club and help to rake in profits.

Fair point about clubs having the same general cast of characters, but, I've generally found that most people are willing to play with anyone who has established some sort of relationship with them, regardless of skill level difference. It is the type of people who will come up to you and ask your rating before asking your name who tend to get rejected, and wonder why they weren't able to get somebody's time.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pingpungpeng Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/05/2019 at 9:41am
Honorable mention to stephane ouaiche for his unique style Smile
Also to hugo calderano for coming from brasil and making it to the top Clap
It's not the same to be born in Brasil or to be born in China/Japan/Germany.


Edited by pingpungpeng - 06/05/2019 at 9:56am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pipboy76 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/05/2019 at 11:06am
Male: Couldn't choose only one so chose 3. Harimoto, Lin Yun Ju, Hugo Calderano
Female: Mima Ito 


Edited by pipboy76 - 06/05/2019 at 11:09am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bappcbrad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/05/2019 at 11:23am
In South Bend, and other local connected clubs, (Elkhart, Mich. City) all the kids we developed were part of a competitive culture that dictated playing and helping the weaker players. This process began with South Bends first coach John Varga, who coached from 1936-1965. Danny still pushes this tool today to the current crop of kids. This in itself taught the adults that they too, were expected to share their skill set with other developing players. I used the adults to teach juniors sportsmanship and the juniors to show the club how to improve the collective skill level of all members. If a club is to survive, for an extended time frame, it must attempt and succeed in improving the skill set of all members in some way. I wrote an article for the Topics years ago on our clubs history and future. (it is posted on my current clubs website at: www.brokenarrowpingpong.com ) bottom left of homepage, formation of South Bend... For clubs to thrive, the top players must GIVE back to the club, with their time, as payment to help develop growth, opportunity and improvement. Clubs need a large Welcome mat and plenty of friendly faces to survive. I've had a few top players that walked their own path, but most understood what was needed to help a club develop. South Bend still is rolling forward, due to so many unselfish individuals associated with our club, (including its current coach, Dan Seemiller) in the last 85 years. Oh, and no one helped more than my friend Virgil Miller. Brad
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bard romance Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/05/2019 at 11:26am
Originally posted by bappcbrad bappcbrad wrote:

In South Bend, and other local connected clubs, (Elkhart, Mich. City) all the kids we developed were part of a competitive culture that dictated playing and helping the weaker players. This process began with South Bends first coach John Varga, who coached from 1936-1965. Danny still pushes this tool today to the current crop of kids. This in itself taught the adults that they too, were expected to share their skill set with other developing players. I used the adults to teach juniors sportsmanship and the juniors to show the club how to improve the collective skill level of all members. If a club is to survive, for an extended time frame, it must attempt and succeed in improving the skill set of all members in some way. I wrote an article for the Topics years ago on our clubs history and future. (it is posted on my current clubs website at: www.brokenarrowpingpong.com ) bottom left of homepage, formation of South Bend... For clubs to thrive, the top players must GIVE back to the club, with their time, as payment to help develop growth, opportunity and improvement. Clubs need a large Welcome mat and plenty of friendly faces to survive. I've had a few top players that walked their own path, but most understood what was needed to help a club develop. South Bend still is rolling forward, due to so many unselfish individuals associated with our club, (including its current coach, Dan Seemiller) in the last 85 years. Oh, and no one helped more than my friend Virgil Miller. Brad


I absolutely agree that it is ideal and I try my best to do my part. My point is that I cannot blame or judge those who don't - at the end of the day, many people play table tennis purely for themselves, and I can't knock that.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mhnh007 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/05/2019 at 3:09pm
Originally posted by danseemiller danseemiller wrote:

Mima Ito for her fierceness. Kanak Jha for his calm demeanor.
I am with you on Mima Ito for the same reason.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Fulanodetal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/11/2019 at 2:45pm


FdT
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote aerial Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/11/2019 at 3:54pm
Originally posted by bard romance bard romance wrote:

Originally posted by bappcbrad bappcbrad wrote:

In South Bend, and other local connected clubs, (Elkhart, Mich. City) all the kids we developed were part of a competitive culture that dictated playing and helping the weaker players. This process began with South Bends first coach John Varga, who coached from 1936-1965. Danny still pushes this tool today to the current crop of kids. This in itself taught the adults that they too, were expected to share their skill set with other developing players. I used the adults to teach juniors sportsmanship and the juniors to show the club how to improve the collective skill level of all members. If a club is to survive, for an extended time frame, it must attempt and succeed in improving the skill set of all members in some way. I wrote an article for the Topics years ago on our clubs history and future. (it is posted on my current clubs website at: www.brokenarrowpingpong.com ) bottom left of homepage, formation of South Bend... For clubs to thrive, the top players must GIVE back to the club, with their time, as payment to help develop growth, opportunity and improvement. Clubs need a large Welcome mat and plenty of friendly faces to survive. I've had a few top players that walked their own path, but most understood what was needed to help a club develop. South Bend still is rolling forward, due to so many unselfish individuals associated with our club, (including its current coach, Dan Seemiller) in the last 85 years. Oh, and no one helped more than my friend Virgil Miller. Brad


I absolutely agree that it is ideal and I try my best to do my part. My point is that I cannot blame or judge those who don't - at the end of the day, many people play table tennis purely for themselves, and I can't knock that.
agreed, hats off to the selfless high level players

can't knock folks just wanting to play their game versus their peers and leave the club either, to each his own.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote aerial Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/11/2019 at 3:55pm
Originally posted by Fulanodetal Fulanodetal wrote:



FdT

I wonder if Harimoto had a similar experience when he was young and instead of crying, he'd cho back at his opponent even louder... this would explain a lot... hahaha
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pongfugrasshopper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/11/2019 at 6:16pm
Adorable little girl. The pride and joy of her parents and now at the top of the JNT.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote anjan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/18/2019 at 2:48pm
Kong Linghui

Edited by anjan - 06/18/2019 at 2:52pm
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