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Mental Game - Relaxed Table Tennis

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    Posted: 12/06/2013 at 1:08am
My coach always tells me to relax.  I never really understood what he meant - I felt I was trying my best during practice and playing at tournaments the same way that I practiced, only that the focus on winning made me slightly more prone to mistakes.

I read Larry Hodges blog tip for Thanksgiving on relaxed play ("Mentality in Match and Practice").  I found it interesting, but thought that the zone was still something people enter on occasion and that Larry was wrong when he said one could practice entering it.

At the NA Teams, I lost 5 matches, one most memorably to a player in his 70s who I now suspect was using dead rubbers.  However, something happened after losing that match - I felt stressed by the fact I was losing so easily, but I never called a time out or tried to fix the situation.  It was almost as if losing didn't bother me as much as it should have.

After I got back from the Teams tournament, I went to my club and played a few matches. It's as if something has overtaken me.  When I miss the ball, I just go to the ball, pick it up and start the next point.  I rarely berate myself anymore.  I've come to accept missing as a mistake that means I should have adjusted in some manner to the last point, and then come back to the game refreshed.  It has made my shots far more patient and controlled.  Even though an old-timer and large looper beat me 3-1 twice, I never felt that I was playing badly.

The most positive surprise is that my shots are far more consistent.  I played my best forehand match ever against an inverted chopper, beating him in 5 straight games.  This is someone who as recently as a month ago likely beat me in 5 straight games.  This reminded me of how well I played when I beat the best regular player at my club 3-0 - it was my one and only time ever beating him and it was such a fluke I never really understood how I did it (the next day, I lost three straight to the same player).  This match with the inverted chopper was different in the sense that I was hardly missing my loops.  And when I missed them, I just picked up the ball and started the point again - there was little mention of injury and frustration.   I also stopped trying to smash the ball and simply spun it as best as I can, with drives only occuring if the ball was high, but never smashes - just topspin drives.

To cut a long story short, I think I now get what my coach meant.  He wanted me to 

1) accept missing /losing points as part of the game
2) be coldly rational about misses/lost points 
3) make adjustments and calmly execute and
4) consistently hit the ball in relaxed manner and in a way that takes advantage of the time I have to play the stroke.

I am not sure how long this zone will last and I am not sure that there aren't people who play better with stress (though this is a good time to play relaxed for me in general).  But I could see one of my club mates and I for the first time fully grasped why my coach complained about his approach to the game, despite his immense talent. Maybe it took me being consistent enough not to miss a lot to get to this point, but I can see that playing relaxed with a good attitude can be really helpful - I think it is going to take my game to the Next Level when combined with the work I put in.  However, even if it doesn't make me a better player, it will make this player (me) feel better - that in many ways, is just as important.


Edited by NextLevel - 12/06/2013 at 1:09am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hunkeelin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/06/2013 at 1:50am
Mental 80% skill 20% in a match. A few days ago,for some reason I was so tensed up that I let a 1400 to take a set from me. I was lucky on the last set because he was missing so much, but my mental affect me so much that I hardly attack and when I attack I miss. Being tense up also affect my reaction; shots that normally could be blocked seems unblockable. 

Edited by hunkeelin - 12/06/2013 at 1:52am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote APW46 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/06/2013 at 4:24am
One thing I learned a long time ago, and I always pass on, is to accept that your opponent is going to hit balls past you if that is what he is trying to do, worrying about it makes a player tense, accepting that its part of the game helps to relax. You might have your tactics right, they can never be 100%, but how well you execute them is key, and being relaxed and calm helps enormously.  
Also it is often beneficial at lower end TT to play 'loose' and relaxed because opponents often have bad technique and playing tight actually suits them, knock the ball around in a relaxed manner and they have nowhere to hide.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote vvk1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/06/2013 at 8:53am
Originally posted by APW46 APW46 wrote:

One thing I learned a long time ago, and I always pass on, is to accept that your opponent is going to hit balls past you if that is what he is trying to do, worrying about it makes a player tense, accepting that its part of the game helps to relax. You might have your tactics right, they can never be 100%, but how well you execute them is key, and being relaxed and calm helps enormously.  
Also it is often beneficial at lower end TT to play 'loose' and relaxed because opponents often have bad technique and playing tight actually suits them, knock the ball around in a relaxed manner and they have nowhere to hide.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote V-Griper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/07/2013 at 2:23am
That type of mental state is what Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi refers to as the flow state. This is what I actually try to attain when I play while others are playing to win. To consistently and purposefully enter a flow state when I play matches is the primary goal for me, because that's the best chance I am going to have of winning

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote larrytt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/07/2013 at 1:57pm
Originally posted by NextLevel NextLevel wrote:

I read Larry Hodges blog tip for Thanksgiving on relaxed play ("Mentality in Match and Practice").  I found it interesting, but thought that the zone was still something people enter on occasion and that Larry was wrong when he said one could practice entering it.
Why do you think you can't practice entering it? Of course you can; you use the same mental techniques in practice that allow you to get into the zone as you would in a tournament. The more you practice doing it, the easier it is to do so in tournaments. Or do you think it's a completely random thing that just sort of happens? That may be true of those who don't understand sports psychology, but the whole point of sports psychology is to allow one to get into the zone on a consistent basis. And you learn to do this with practice; there's no other way. That's why top players meet with sports psychologists so they can learn these mental techniques, and then they practice these techniques in practice sessions (including practice matches) - and then they can do it in serious competition. The idea that it just sort of happens is not how top players do it, which is why the top players can get into the zone and play their best nearly every major tournament. It comes from practice. I know I can get into the zone pretty much at will within a game of any match because I've practiced it for many years and know what mental rituals to go through to attain it. Read "The Inner Game of Tennis," or "Get Your Game Face On!" or "Finding Your Zone."
-Larry Hodges
 


Edited by larrytt - 12/09/2013 at 10:33am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote benfb Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/07/2013 at 2:26pm
Over the years I've learned to play relaxed, but where I struggle is when I'm playing injured, because then I make mistakes that I wouldn't ordinarily make, and that makes me more tense. I'm not sure how to stay relaxed through trauma.

Current example: a few months ago I had bleeding in my right eye, which has led to impairment in that eye (it's like looking through the smoke from a large campfire).  This makes it hard for me to track balls on my right side and also for me to judge the distance to balls (because the right eye can't help much with depth perception).  One typical example is that I sometimes now completely miss on "normal" balls (top spin, no funny spins, not fast or tricky), especially on balls a few feet above the table.  This gives me the same feeling as if I suddenly couldn't remember how to write my own name or add numbers together -- very frustrated.

At my home club, it's not too bad because we have great lighting and I know the other players (so I can find ways to compensate).  However, at the Teams I really struggled to see the ball (just for reference, I much preferred the 2012 lighting at Baltimore to the 2013 lighting in DC, but, to be fair, I did mostly play next to columns, where the lighting was worst).  I even cut the center of my rubber on a table (misjudging both the ball and the table), which I haven't done in many years.  All that struggle to see made me very tense, which only made my strokes worse. 

Being tense not only messed up my strokes, but it interferes with strategic thinking.  Afterwards, I realized how much I limited my own play (only certain shots, only using a few of my serves, etc.) because I was so focused on what I couldn't do.

It's very hard to accept that I really am less of a player today than I was a year ago, and to stay relaxed about it.  I'm not sure how to maintain the right mental frame under those circumstances. Any suggestions?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NextLevel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/07/2013 at 2:55pm
Originally posted by larrytt larrytt wrote:

Why do you think you can't practice entering it? Of course you can; you use the same mental techniques in practice that allow you to get into the zone as you would in a tournament. The more you practice doing it, the easier it is to do so in tournaments. Or do you think it's a completely random thing that just sort of happens? That may be true of those who don't understand sports psychology, but the whole point of sports psychology is to allow one to get into the zone on a consistent basis. And you learn to do this with practice; there's no other way. That's why top players meet with sports psychologists so they can learn these mental techniques, and then they practice these techniques in practice sessions (including practice matches) - and then they can do it in serious competition. The idea that it just sort of happens is not how top players do it, which is why the top players can get into the zone and play their best nearly every major tournament. It comes from practice. I know I can get into the zone pretty much at will within a game of any match because I've practiced it for many years and know what mental rituals to go through to attain it. Read "The Inner Game of Tennis," or "Get Your Game Face On!"
-Larry Hodges
 

Usually, it's easier to enter the zone when you aren't being frustrated by your opponent - the level of challenge usually matches the focus you bring.  Most players get frustrated in TT when they are missing the ball.  The question is whether you can be in the zone and not playing that well.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote APW46 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/07/2013 at 2:57pm
Originally posted by larrytt larrytt wrote:

Originally posted by NextLevel NextLevel wrote:

I read Larry Hodges blog tip for Thanksgiving on relaxed play ("Mentality in Match and Practice").  I found it interesting, but thought that the zone was still something people enter on occasion and that Larry was wrong when he said one could practice entering it.
Why do you think you can't practice entering it? Of course you can; you use the same mental techniques in practice that allow you to get into the zone as you would in a tournament. The more you practice doing it, the easier it is to do so in tournaments. 
 
 Absolutely, To further that, I give my experience.
 It took until I was 33yrs old ( started playing at 13) before I learned this, and when I did, I had an unusually late in life run up the ratings to UK prem standard, after being a local league player for 20 years. You don't get 'the zone' in the classical sense, that happens when it happens, but an overall higher level of concentration. I ALWAYS approach matchplay practice in the same way I do in competition, If I am practising Matchplay, I class 'matchplay' as a drill, so no gambling/trying things out, just practice what I would do in a match mentally.  Play games for fun, however its easy to be self absorbed and just practice your power strokes because there is no pressure, If you do that, you are most definitely not practising your matchplay.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote larrytt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/07/2013 at 3:06pm
Originally posted by NextLevel NextLevel wrote:

Usually, it's easier to enter the zone when you aren't being frustrated by your opponent - the level of challenge usually matches the focus you bring.  Most players get frustrated in TT when they are missing the ball.  The question is whether you can be in the zone and not playing that well.
 
Half the point of sports psychology is so that things in a match do not frustrate you. If the opponent is frustrating you, then you need to apply the sports psychology techniques used by top players to overcome this. Once in the zone, you will play well, relative to how you would play if not in it. If the opponent does something that really messes you up, it'll mess you up less if you are in the zone.
 
I'm often in demand as a coach in tournaments. Those who believe coaching at tournaments is all about tactics are only doing half their job. At least half of it is psychological as you use various techniques to get your player into the zone. You can't always do this - a frustrated kid can be hard to get into the zone - but I've been doing this for many years, along with the tactical aspect. The two go together - once someone is thinking about the tactical aspects (which means 2-3 tactics out of zillions of possibilities), then they aren't thinking about losing or other distracting thoughts, and is a quick way to get into the zone.
 
-Larry Hodges


Edited by larrytt - 12/09/2013 at 10:36am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Baal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/08/2013 at 8:19pm
Originally posted by V-Griper V-Griper wrote:

That type of mental state is what Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi refers to as the flow state.


I am pretty sure that if I could even pronounce "Mihaly Csikszentimihalyi" I would instantly enter some sort of flow state.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NextLevel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/08/2013 at 8:32pm
Chick sent me highly.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Baal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/08/2013 at 8:38pm
Next Level just attained Buddha-hood.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snerdly Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/08/2013 at 11:19pm
Some claim that flow state inhibits self awareness.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jrscatman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/09/2013 at 12:50am
Originally posted by snerdly snerdly wrote:

Some claim that flow state inhibits self awareness.
I believe the guy in the video explains the reason for this neurological bandwidth issues.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote stiltt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/09/2013 at 1:55am
Originally posted by Baal Baal wrote:

Next Level just attained Buddha-hood.
LOL
as an additional note, the flow state side effect of chick sent me highly is nothing without the possibility to reproduce it on demand; of course next step is to be able to teach it, to pass it on; that's when we really know about it; when we do not care about ourselves anymore, when we just have to do the job, we play better and coaching helps tremendously for that matter.
I play best in tourneys telling myself practice and matches at the club is the real enjoyment; to give my best in tourneys I have to take myself down to a worker level: just do the job; don't think about what you like and do not like; or what could happen; just do the work. That way I take my ego out of the equation and something happens; hard to describe; I'd say I become the spectator of my own game and awareness improves; details are sharper; return of serves are more confident, all strokes flow better and a miss does not hurt, it is just a miss.
People will feel that awareness improvement and some will try to attack it with trash talk; a remark, a false compliment like "you play pretty good today", "whooo you are on fire my friend"etc...anything polluting to break that balance they know makes me play better. That's when I go for eye contact with a big smile, saying nothing. I still have trouble to manage trash talk from other people though; it does make me leave the zone.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Re1Mu2R3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/09/2013 at 8:34am
Hey thanks a lot for making this thread. It's sad 99% of all threads in this forum is about Equipment when psychology is half the game.

So today I played against a high level club veteran. Relatively young and about just a small step down from national level. I was doing drills with him and another older player criticized my strokes as being powerless. The club veteran then attempted to correct my strokes but when I broke the drill missing a shot that clipped the net he told me I shouldn't have attempted to change the rhythm just because of the net. Sad part was, I wasn't trying to change my form. Somehow he noticed every wrong habit of mine. He then discussed that I should be thinking of my shots all the time and integrate them to my subconscious. When we proceeded to play I started by attempting my typical third ball setup I get 90% of the time and he just flicked the serve like it was nothing. My performance was just downhill from there. I had practiced the strokes and knew what had to be done but my feet just wouldn't move. My form was awkward and felt unnatural.

I knew he meant well coaching me but it just really f**ked me in the head thinking all my previous training sessions and wins in other clubs meant nothing and have been a waste of time because I couldn't score good points with him. I had like 2 legitimate points and the rest were just his errors and a few giveaways.

Anyone have inputs on this?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NextLevel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/09/2013 at 9:09am
Originally posted by Re1Mu2R3 Re1Mu2R3 wrote:

Hey thanks a lot for making this thread. It's sad 99% of all threads in this forum is about Equipment when psychology is half the game.

So today I played against a high level club veteran. Relatively young and about just a small step down from national level. I was doing drills with him and another older player criticized my strokes as being powerless. The club veteran then attempted to correct my strokes but when I broke the drill missing a shot that clipped the net he told me I shouldn't have attempted to change the rhythm just because of the net. Sad part was, I wasn't trying to change my form. Somehow he noticed every wrong habit of mine. He then discussed that I should be thinking of my shots all the time and integrate them to my subconscious. When we proceeded to play I started by attempting my typical third ball setup I get 90% of the time and he just flicked the serve like it was nothing. My performance was just downhill from there. I had practiced the strokes and knew what had to be done but my feet just wouldn't move. My form was awkward and felt unnatural.

I knew he meant well coaching me but it just really f**ked me in the head thinking all my previous training sessions and wins in other clubs meant nothing and have been a waste of time because I couldn't score good points with him. I had like 2 legitimate points and the rest were just his errors and a few giveaways.

Anyone have inputs on this?
What were the good things you took out of all this?
I like putting heavy topspin on the ball...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote stiltt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/09/2013 at 9:12am
Yes I do; 
A coach trying to make you becoming somebody else is wrong; a player is not a machine made out parts you can upgrade just like that. a good coach must first see your strengths and weaknesses and work from there to make you evolve, not making you another player.
He meant good; I hope you can still understand what he meant and work from there yourself. If he keeps trying to change you too much in one time, just say "not so fast, one step at a time".

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote danseemiller Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/09/2013 at 9:51am
Hi Larry, You are so right that coaching tactics is only half the job of a coach.
 If you want to play your best winning/losing in not in the equation.
 Doing your best and being prepared are the only things that matter.
 Preparation means good warmup, scout the opponent if possible especially their serves and stance. keep a clear mind, control your emotions then give 100 percent to the match. Each and every point is a match in a way.
 If you try to win you will not play your best. Over the years my students have done pretty well because they know I don't care if they win/lose only that all of the above is done.
   If you give it your all that is the only thing that matters.  Oh one last thing  NO EXCUSES no matter how valid you think yours is.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BRS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/09/2013 at 10:00am
I second Larrytt's recommendation of Get Your Game Face On.  It is $5 on kindle so not a big risk.  I got it this week and had a tournament two days later, so didn't practice the techniques at all, but it still helped me a lot.  I am usually a very nervous tournament player, this is my first year doing it, and I am a nervous person already.  

Full disclosure:  I didn't play better from using the GYGFO advice.  I played like I always play.  But I didn't get so wound up about it.  Example, in one game against a 11-yr-old girl (I am 45-yr-old man) I was ahead 8-6 and realized all 6 of her points came from me missing the same easy FH down the line.  I ended up losing that game 12-10.  Normally I would be so angry at myself, and would carry negative thought over in to the important 3rd game (we were 1-1).  But I found that not reacting to the misses --  no talking to myself, no pulling faces, none of the stuff I always do, worked to keep me from getting tensed and frustrated.  I just calmly thought to close the blade a little more, and went back to playing better.

Maybe the better results will come later, after I practice this technique more.  But the most important thing for me, who will never be any kind of serious TT competitor, is I had an even better time than I ever have at a tournament before, maybe 12 times.  Being angry at yourself over missing TT shots really takes a lot of the joy out of what is supposed to be just a fun game, something for pleasure and a challenge.    
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NextLevel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/09/2013 at 11:18am
BRS,

Your experience was the same as mine. I find it funny because it was my initial approach to table tennis, and someone told me that being intense was the way to go. However, I am seeing that I feel better when I play a relaxed game. I do believe it will translate to better play because I think being overly emotional creates inconsistency. I had a lot of recent losses to juniors and I think that part of the problem was that I let what they were doing affect my attitude towards how I should play. Nowadays, I just relax and do whatever it takes. There are still gaps to fill, but ultimately, the feeling should keep me going in the mean time.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Re1Mu2R3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/09/2013 at 11:38am
Originally posted by fatt fatt wrote:

Yes I do; 
A coach trying to make you becoming somebody else is wrong; a player is not a machine made out parts you can upgrade just like that. a good coach must first see your strengths and weaknesses and work from there to make you evolve, not making you another player.
He meant good; I hope you can still understand what he meant and work from there yourself. If he keeps trying to change you too much in one time, just say "not so fast, one step at a time".



Thanks. Funny because earlier tonight I played against a younger player with more refined strokes than mine possibly receiving regular coaching. She easily beat me 2 sets but I was able to get myself 'in the zone' and win the match eventually.

Somehow when doing drills with the veteran while I took the advice and was able to achieve instant improvements in the drills, but random thoughts such as:

"He knows your techniques are flawed. He must be right since he's been playing longer than you."
"You're going to have to spend 15 years catching up to his level since that's how long it took to get him there"
"You're a disgrace to Wang Hao trying to play pen like him"

and more limiting beliefs of that nature just filled my head.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Baal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/09/2013 at 11:40am
Does anybody have techniques they use to enter the relaxed mental state while they are playing?  The idea itself is not new.  There were classic texts on this, like the Inner Game of Tennis etc.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Baal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/09/2013 at 11:42am
Originally posted by danseemiller danseemiller wrote:

Hi Larry, You are so right that coaching tactics is only half the job of a coach.
 If you want to play your best winning/losing in not in the equation.
 Doing your best and being prepared are the only things that matter.
 Preparation means good warmup, scout the opponent if possible especially their serves and stance. keep a clear mind, control your emotions then give 100 percent to the match. Each and every point is a match in a way.
 If you try to win you will not play your best. Over the years my students have done pretty well because they know I don't care if they win/lose only that all of the above is done.
   If you give it your all that is the only thing that matters.  Oh one last thing  NO EXCUSES no matter how valid you think yours is.
DS


Dan, what did you used to do at deuce games etc. in important tournaments?  Was there something you did before serving or returning to get your nerves under control, or relax your body, get your breathing under control? 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jrscatman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/09/2013 at 12:07pm
Originally posted by Baal Baal wrote:

Does anybody have techniques they use to enter the relaxed mental state while they are playing?  The idea itself is not new.  There were classic texts on this, like the Inner Game of Tennis etc.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kevo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/09/2013 at 4:41pm
Something I read once--perhaps on here, can't remember--is to clench one fist briefly between points/squeeze the ball tightly before serving as this activates some place in the brain which triggers muscle memory and/or relaxation?  I can't remember really but it does work.  Another thing I've read is to have a mantra and say it to yourself just before each point begins.  It helps if it is in a different language or is, in fact, nonsense, (counting backwards in French from 5 for ex.) as this moves one's thoughts into a different part of the brain and allows the body to do its work.  These are kind of triggers for accessing the zone, I guess.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Pushdeep Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/09/2013 at 5:21pm
I think it is good to talk to yourself. Your conscious mind needs to communicate to your subconscious mind and talking is a good way to do this. You should compartmentalize yourself into two actors - coach and player. Coach observes and analyzes and the player executes the coach's instructions. Regular coach cannot communicate to his player via telepathy so your inner coach should not try telepathy either. Coach half of brain speaks, player half listens.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Roger Stillabower Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/09/2013 at 5:35pm
The zone, I have experience this in a lot of things, work, playing cards, table tennis, etc., I just wished I could bottle it, I'd be rich. lol.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote APW46 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/10/2013 at 7:22am
Originally posted by Pushdeep Pushdeep wrote:

I think it is good to talk to yourself. Your Coach half of brain speaks, player half listens.

  +1, Norman Bates style.
The Older I get, The better I was.
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